Posts Tagged: "Andrei Iancu"

PTAB Masters™ 2022, Day Three: Iancu Slams Repeat Proceedings, Panelists Opine on Breyer Retirement

The third day of IPWatchdog’s PTAB Masters™ 2022 featured more from former U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) Director Andrei Iancu, as well as panels covering topics such as avoiding obviousness mistakes, appellate strategies from the Patent Trial and Appeal Board (PTAB) and other intricacies of PTAB practice from the experts. Panelists this afternoon also weighed in on today’s announcement that Justice Stephen Breyer will retire from the Supreme Court, opening the door for Biden to appoint a replacement.

On Day Two of PTAB Masters™ 2022, Panelists Dig into Data Showing Fintiv Denials May Be Dead for Texas Cases

The first panel of Tuesday’s PTAB Masters™ 2022, titled “Discretionary Denials: Has the WDTX Been Neutered?”, presented data that reveals the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office’s (USPTO’s) Patent Trial and Appeal Board (PTAB) seemingly stopped citing Fintiv as a reason to discretionarily deny inter partes review (IPR) proceedings for cases with parallel litigation in the Western or Eastern Districts of Texas (WD of TX/ ED of TX) during the last four months of 2021. While the PTAB issued a larger number of institution decisions overall in those months compared with previous months, and a larger number of cases citing Fintiv, there was also a relatively low number of cases across all jurisdictions in which discretion to deny was applied based on the Fintiv analysis.

Day One of PTAB Masters™ 2022: Tillis and Iancu Chime in on PTAB and Patent System Problems

The first day of IPWatchdog’s PTAB Masters™ 2022 program featured a welcome from Senator Thom Tillis (R-NC), Ranking Member of the Senate Judiciary Committee’s Subcommittee on Intellectual Property, who told attendees that Congress should consider codifying some of the reforms made by former U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) Director Andrei Iancu in order to better avoid “gamesmanship” at the Patent Trial and Appeal Board. Tillis specifically called out entities like OpenSky Industries, who last December petitioned the PTAB to institute an IPR proceeding challenging claims from one of two patents involved in VLSI Technologies’ $2.175 billion jury verdict for patent infringement against Intel, which was handed down in March 2021 in the Western District of Texas.

Iancu and Kappos: TRIPS IP Waiver Proposal Will Kill More People Than It Saves

A webinar hosted on Tuesday, January 12, by The Federalist Society’s Regulatory Transparency Project featured former U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) Directors Andrei Iancu and David Kappos, as well as Duke University Professor of Law and former USPTO Administrator of the Office of External Affairs Arti Rai, discussing the proposal to the World Trade Organization (WTO) to waive IP rights under the Trade-Related aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) Agreement for certain COVID-19 technologies. While all three panelists agreed that the IP waiver discussion has become a distraction that will not solve the fundamental problems, Iancu and Kappos were especially passionate that the precedent set by the U.S. government’s decision to back the proposal could do very real harm, rather than good.

Rethinking Innovation with Michel, Iancu, and Watts

In early November, the University of Illinois Chicago (UIC) School of Law held its 65th Annual Intellectual Property Law Conference. The program consisted of five plenary sessions and ten breakout sessions featuring candid discussions and networking sessions with judges, senior government officials, and leaders of supranational IP offices, multinational corporations, law firms, academia, and nonprofit organizations. IPWatchdog’s Founder and CEO, Gene Quinn, moderated the second plenary session, “Global Patent Issues.” The program kicked off with a featured panel consisting of Andrei Iancu, Partner at Irell & Manella, Former Under Secretary of Commerce for Intellectual Property, and Former Director of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office; the Honorable Paul R. Michel (ret.), former Chief Judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit; and Brad Watts, Minority Chief Counsel for the United States Senate Judiciary Committee, Subcommittee on Intellectual Property. Professor Daryl Lim, Director of UIC’s Center for Intellectual Property, Information and Privacy Law, moderated the discussion.

Iancu, Locke and Kappos Slam Biden Administration’s Support for COVID IP Waiver in New White Paper

Former U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) Directors Andrei Iancu and David Kappos, and former Secretary of Commerce Gary Locke, today released a White Paper calling the Biden Administration’s decision to support a waiver of intellectual property protections for COVID-19-related technologies under the Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) “strategic folly.” The report was produced by the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS). In the paper, titled “The Shot Heard around the World”, the three officials, two of whom served under the Obama Administration, explained that the United States must indeed ramp up its efforts to improve vaccine diplomacy and to distribute more vaccines globally, but that “[w]aiving IP protections would not lead to the manufacture of a single additional dose of a vaccine.” Instead, they proposed a number of alternative solutions to solve the “real problems.”

Eagle Forum Event Participants Delve into Patent Eligibility ‘Goulash’

The extreme uncertainty that U.S. patent eligibility “validity goulash” jurisprudence has caused is wreaking havoc on inventors, especially those working on emerging technologies. It is also hindering patent owners’ ability to enforce their property rights, investment and licensing deal-making, and giving China advantages in global competitiveness. And it’s likely to get worse before it gets better. Those were takeaways from the Eagle Forum Education & Legal Defense Fund’s (EFELDF) “The Sorry State of Patentability: ‘Anything Under the Sun Made by Man’ No More” program in Washington, D.C. The September 29 event’s panelists considered patent eligibility from the Chakrabarty decision, which ruled a manmade living microorganism was patent-eligible, to dubious, damaging, judicially-created exceptions in such cases as Bilski, Mayo, Alice, Myriad and American Axle. The participants made painfully clear that the Alice-Mayo Framework doesn’t work and course correction is long overdue.

Iancu, Kilbride, Israel Separate Fact from Fiction During IPWatchdog LIVE Panel on TRIPS IP Waiver

On Monday of IPWatchdog LIVE in Dallas, a panel on “The TRIPS IP Waiver: Separating Fact & Fiction” was moderated by president and CEO of the PCT learning center and founding partner of Berenato & White, John White, and featured IP leaders Andrei Iancu, Patrick Kilbride, and Chris Israel. The Trade Related Aspects of Intellectual Property (TRIPS) agreement is an international agreement among members of the World Trade Organization (WTO), which sets minimum standards in the international rules governing intellectual property. In 2020, India and South Africa proposed a TRIPS Agreement waiver proposal that would temporarily waive intellectual property rights protections for technologies needed to prevent, contain, or treat COVID-19, including vaccines and vaccine-related products. The proposal has been hotly contested globally, but the Biden Administration said in May of this year that the United States would back it.

Emerging Anti-IP Policies the Focus of Heritage Foundation Event

At today’s Heritage Foundation event in Washington, D.C., titled Restoring American Leadership in Patent Law and Innovation Policy, former U.S. Patent and Trademark Office Director (USPTO) Andrei Iancu began by lamenting the failure of decision makers to make the connection between intellectual property and innovation. Increasingly, policy makers think innovation just happens, Iancu explained, with too many believing monetization happens after the fact, rather than driving innovation. “Without IP, the free market does not participate, or does not participate to scale,” Iancu told the Heritage audience. Laurie Self, Senior Vice President and Counsel, Government Affairs, Qualcomm, agreed with Iancu and added that, without a strong patent system, there is no opportunity to maintain a strong innovation leadership position. Presumably alluding to developments such as the Biden Administration’s support for waiving IP rights under the Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) related to COVID-19 inventions and the recent Executive Order on Competition, Self said: “We are seeing a series of policies that if implemented would undermine our system… this cognitive dissonance is a threat.”

New Clause 8 Episode: Andrei Iancu – From Communist Romania to USPTO Director

At the beginning of this year, IPWatchdog asked a panel of experts who should be the next USPTO Director. Almost every answer cited former USPTO Director Andrei Iancu as a model. Former Deputy USPTO Director Russ Slifer wrote: “Director Iancu worked with Congress and did not shy away from necessary reforms in Section 101 and the PTAB. Will the next Director be as successful? Hopefully, but Director Iancu is a difficult act to follow.” At the beginning of this year, IPWatchdog asked a panel of experts who should be the next USPTO Director. Almost every answer cited former USPTO Director Andrei Iancu as a model.

Iancu Weighs in on IP Waiver, Critical Role of Patents for SMEs at World IP Day Event

“Property rights are not just good for the economy, they save lives”, Grover Norquist, President of Americans for Tax Reform said, speaking at Innovating the Future: Celebrating 2021 World IP Day, sponsored by the Property Rights Alliance. Norquist would go on to conclude his brief opening remarks by lamenting, “the damage that would be done if some of the critics of intellectual property have their way.” Norquist was implicitly referring to an IP waiver proposal by South Africa and India, which would allow nations to ignore patent rights relating to COVID-19 related innovations, particularly vaccines. This waiver of the Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) is a truly bad idea, and one addressed head on by Andrei Iancu, senior adviser to the Renewing America Innovation Project at the Center for Strategic and International Studies and former Director of the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO).

Iancu Says Goodbye, Urges Commitment to ‘American Innovation Renaissance’

One day before Joe Biden was to be inaugurated as the 46th U.S. President, U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) Director Andrei Iancu confirmed he would be leaving his position as USPTO Director, reminiscing on his tenure with the Office in his latest Director’s Forum blog post and in remarks made at a United States Chamber of Commerce Global Innovation Policy Center event yesterday. Iancu recalled his successful efforts to clarify examination guidelines on patent eligibility and to balance post-grant proceedings, noting that, “In light of our many carefully-calibrated reforms, Senator Tillis recently said that the PTAB is no longer a death squad for patents. It is indeed a new day at the PTAB.” While many would not agree, it is generally accepted that Iancu’s administration has been a boon for patents, and the IP community will no doubt be sad to see him go.

USPTO Steps Into Social Media Controversy

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) doesn’t often get much action on social media, but last week, five days before the U.S. Presidential election, the Office came under fire for its social media posts touting the United States’ record on intellectual property under the Trump Administration. The posts featured the following quote from USPTO Director Andrei Iancu: “Just a reminder, under President Trump’s leadership, the U.S. intellectual property ecosystem ranks #1 in the world, according to the 2020 International IP Index.”

PTAB Precedential Decision Nomination Form Could Lead to More Controversial Decision-Making Outside of Informal Rulemaking

In late September, Bloomberg News reported that Scott Boalick, Chief Administrative Patent Judge (APJ) at the Patent Trial and Appeal Board (PTAB), announced the introduction of a new form allowing members of the public the ability to nominate certain PTAB decisions for precedential status. The form, available on the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office’s website, asks those endorsing decisions to choose whether precedential or informative status should be conferred and to provide some brief reasons for the nomination. As Bloomberg’s coverage suggests, the anonymous nature of the process could encourage nominations from practitioners representing both patent owners and petitioners at the PTAB who may be concerned about how some clients may view their nominations. Such client overlap is a common feature at the PTAB, where many of the most active law firms representing patent owners are also atop the list of most active petitioners’ counsel.

Shira Perlmutter to Head U.S. Copyright Office

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) announced today that Shira Perlmutter, the Office’s Chief Policy Officer and Director for International Affairs, has been chosen by Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden to be the 14th U.S. Register of Copyrights. Maria Strong has been serving as Acting Register since January 2020, after former Register Karyn Temple left the position in December 2019. Temple had been promoted to Register in March 2019 following two and a half years serving as Acting Register. Maria Pallante, the 12th Register of Copyrights, had been fired from the position in 2016.