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Posts Tagged ‘ bob stoll ’

Jay Walker’s No-Fault Patent Licensing System Takes Shape

Posted: Thursday, May 15, 2014 @ 8:00 am | Written by Gene Quinn | 4 comments
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Posted in: Gene Quinn, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patent Business & Deals, Patents

Jay Walker, Priceline.com founder.

On Monday, May 12, 2014, Patent Properties, Inc. (OTCQB: PPRO), the brainchild of Priceline.com founder Jay Walker, announced the appointment of Robert Stoll, former Commissioner for Patents at the United States Patent and Trademark Office, to Chair the Patent Properties Advisory Board. Joining Stoll on the Board will be Mona Sutphen, former White House Deputy Chief of Staff for Policy for President Obama; Vinit Nijhawan, Managing Director, Office of Technology Development and Lecturer in the Entrepreneurship Programs Office at Boston University; Louis Foreman, CEO & Founder of Edison Nation; and Stephen Merrill, former Executive Director of the National Academies’ Program on Science, Technology, and Economic Policy.

The purpose of the Board is to advise Patent Properties’ senior leadership on business, policy, regulatory, and legal issues related to the development, launch, and growth. Board members will serve in an advisory capacity without operational or decision-making responsibilities.

But what is Patent Properties?



What happens to IP law in 2014?

Posted: Thursday, Jan 2, 2014 @ 4:49 pm | Written by Robert Stoll | 6 comments
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Posted in: Guest Contributors, International, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patent Reform, Patents, Software

It’s 2014, and an angel calls me “grandpa”!  What happened to that teenage kid in the mirror — and who is the old man staring back at me?  Well, at least the acne is gone. Enough on the personal horrors of aging (which are way worse than any Hollywood syfy).  What happens to IP law in 2014?

Near the end of 2013, the Supreme Court granted cert in CLS Bank v. Alice on issues related to software patentability, and many expect that the sagacious Justices will clarify the confusion they created about patent eligibility in earlier decisions, like Prometheus, that were amplified in the splintered en banc panel on CLS Bank at the Federal Circuit. I prophesy that the best we can hope for is a Bilski-esque  vague instruction (wherein our top court opined that some business methods are patentable, citing the machine or transformation test as one viable test, without pointing to other valid tests and without enlightening the confused public.)

The Court is once again likely to limit software patentability in some arcane way that harms job creation and stifles economic growth. The bright side is that the Court’s failure to protect our largest growth industries may help spur the legislative branch into further action.  A decade of intermittent patent reforms has created a permanent cadre of patent lobbyists very willing to focus their considerable efforts and talents on a new patent issue.  It would be advantageous to the patent system if that attention were productively channeled to specifically include our emerging technologies in our patent statutes, and to legislate patent eligibility in a manner that treats 101 as the broad filter it was intended to be, while employing the other patent statutes, such as 112 and 103, to correctly provide the narrower filters.



Industry Insiders Reflect on the Biggest Moments of 2013

Posted: Tuesday, Dec 31, 2013 @ 3:28 pm | Written by Gene Quinn | 11 comments
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Posted in: Guest Contributors, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patents

It is that time of the year when reflections are made on the year that is about to pass, wishes are made for the new year, and a prediction or two start to pop from both amateur and professional prognosticators alike. Once again this year I thought I would ask some industry insiders to reflect upon the biggest moments in intellectual property for 2013. We will get to the hopes, wishes and maybe a prediction or two for 2014 next week.

In this edition of Biggest Moments in IP we have a variety of reflections on a wide array of IP issues. Todd Dickinson goes international by pointing to the EU Unitary Patent as a very important long-term milestone, and congratulates the USPTO on being ranked the top place to work in the federal government. Scott McKeown focuses on a decision from the Federal Circuit that will allow collateral challenges to damage awards. Bob Stoll points to the Innovation act, Federal Circuit disarray over software, the “revolutionary” Supreme Court decision in Myriad and the Microsoft/Motorola FRAND decision.

In my mind the biggest story for 2013 is the unfortunate reality that the erosion of patent rights continues to accelerate. See Patent Erosion 2013: What Would the Founding Fathers Think?  For more thoughts take a look at Peter Pappas’ look backward and look ahead in Reflections on 2013 and Some Thoughts on the Year Ahead.

Additionally, it may be interesting to take a look at what those in the industry thought the biggest moments of 2012 were, see Industry Insiders Reflect on Biggest Moments in IP for 2012.



Patent Eligibility in Unsettled Times

Posted: Thursday, Nov 7, 2013 @ 7:45 am | Written by Gene Quinn | 17 comments
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Posted in: Biotechnology, Gene Quinn, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patentability, Patents, Software

Ten years ago if you said that patent eligibility would become one of the most important, hotly debated issues in the patent field most in the industry probably would have thought you simply didn’t know what you were talking about. Five years ago some saw the issues percolating, but still many in the trenches with their day-to-day practice life would likely still have raise a cautious eyebrow and questioned why you thought even the Supreme Court might turn its back on a solid generation of well established patent law. The tone was perhaps cautious, but most couldn’t imagine that the Supreme Court and the Federal Circuit would cease their expansive view of patent eligibility.

Oh how times change!

Today, after several years of substantial turmoil, patent eligibility in a variety of economically significant technologies is extremely uncertain, including software, natural products, medical diagnostics and personalized medicine. It is with great irony that one of the few things we know with any degree of certainty is that business methods are patent eligible. We likewise know that at least some cDNA is patent eligible, except that man-made cDNA that happens to be identical to what occurs in nature. Of course, that raises more questions than it answers.



Silicon Valley Seeks Answers for Patent Litigation Abuse

Posted: Wednesday, Apr 10, 2013 @ 7:55 am | Written by Gene Quinn | 13 comments
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Posted in: Gene Quinn, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patent Litigation, Patent Trolls, Patents

Recently I learned that Drinker Biddle & Reath LLP and NERA Economic Consulting are teaming together to co-sponsoring a luncheon on May 8, 2013, at the Four Seasons Hotel Silicon Valley at East Palo Alto to discuss effective responses to patent infringement claims and threats of such claims from patent assertion entities – also known as patent trolls. According to Bob Stoll, former Commissioner for Patents who is currently with Drinker Biddle, “Our program will explore the reasons for the steady — some would say explosive — rise in PAE enforcement practices in recent years and what various categories of the targets of these practices might do about it.”

The reason this luncheon discussion caught my attention was because it cross through my e-mail box at a time when I was already working on updating patent litigation statistics I have accumulated dated back to 1980. See The Rise of Patent Litigation in America: 1980 – 2012.

Certainly there is an increase in the number of patent litigation lawsuits brought, particularly over the last several years. Many want to blame patent wars over smart phones and pretend that they are something unusual, when in fact patent wars over important technologies are hardly new. In fact, there were 600 patent lawsuits brought over an 11 year span relating to the invention of the telephone. See Worldwide History of Telecommunications. Yet, Apple has been involved in 142 patent lawsuits relating to the smartphone since 2006 according to the NY Times.  This should help put into perspective the so-called smartphone patent war problem. The smartphone patent wars are of a much smaller scale and hardly the first battles of their kind. Amazing how telephone technology prospered even with 600 patent lawsuits. The patent nay-sayers would have you believe that is impossible, but we know it happened.

But what is the solution? Do we even need a solution?



Industry Insiders Reflect on Biggest Moments in IP for 2012

Posted: Thursday, Dec 27, 2012 @ 9:15 am | Written by Gene Quinn | 2 comments
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Posted in: America Invents Act, Beth Hutchens, Congress, Copyright, Gene Quinn, Guest Contributors, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patents

It is that time of the year when reflections are made on the year that is about to pass, wishes are made for the new year, and a prediction or two start to pop from both amateur and professional prognosticators alike. In years past we have done a Patent Wishes article, which is currently in the works. This year I thought I would add an article that gave some industry insiders an opportunity to reflect upon the biggest moments in intellectual property for 2012.

Whenever I do something like this I keep my fingers crossed. The biggest moments in IP seem rather obvious to me, so will they to others? Will I wind up printing the same thing 5 or 6 times? The answer: Absolutely not! We had a very busy year, from Supreme Court decisions to failed legislation to fight piracy on the Internet, to important Federal Circuit cases and implementation of the America Invents Act.

Indeed, for this inaugural edition of Biggest Moments in IP we have a variety of reflections on a wide array of IP issues. Former Commissioner for Patents Bob Stoll walked through some of the biggest items on the patent docket for the year. Stephen Kunin of Oblon Spivak gives us his Top 10 list in David Letterman style. Former staffer to Senator Leahy (D-VT) and current lobbyist Marla Grossman reflects on Senator Leahy’s decision to refuse the Chairmanship of the Senate Appropriations Committee to stay on as Chair of the Judiciary Committee. IP attorney and frequent feature contributor to IPWatchdog.com Beth Hutchens focuses on several copyright and first amendment issues, and reminds us of the battle that ensued to defeat SOPA.



Bob Stoll Part 3 – SCOTUS, the Future CAFC, Inequitable Conduct

Posted: Friday, Aug 10, 2012 @ 7:25 am | Written by Gene Quinn | 2 comments
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Posted in: Gene Quinn, Interviews & Conversations, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patents

On July 19, 2012, I interviewed Bob Stoll at the Washington, D.C., offices of Drinker Biddle. In part 1 we discussed his adjusting to life in the private sector, the fact that he doesn’t enjoy the billable hour part of private practice (just like every other attorney I know) and we discussed politics a bit, as well as the U.S. economy and innovation policy. In part 2 we discussed Presidential politics, how innovation drives the U.S. economy, why a great new technology that has spawned an entirely new industry as we have coming out of so many recessions in the past, patent examination process and how to streamline the examination process.

In this final installment, Bob Stoll and I discuss the United States Supreme Court. We spend some time talking about the Supreme Court’s recent patent eligible subject matter decisions. We also discuss the problem of bad patent applications contributing to bad law and slower, more inefficient patent prosecution. We also discuss inequitable conduct after Therasense and who might make a good addition to the Federal Circuit. Stoll says the name he keeps hearing is Todd Dickinson.

Without further ado, here is part 3 of my interview with Bob Stoll.



Bob Stoll Part 2 – Innovation, Economy, Patent Examination

Posted: Wednesday, Aug 8, 2012 @ 11:32 am | Written by Gene Quinn | 2 comments
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Posted in: Gene Quinn, Interviews & Conversations, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patent Prosecution, Patents, US Economy

Bob Stoll (right) at the White House, Nov. 2010, with then USPTO Deputy Director Sharon Barner.

On July 19, 2012, I interviewed Bob Stoll, former Commissioner for Patents of the United States Patent and Trademark Office.  The interview took place in a conference room at Drinker Biddleon K Street in Washington, D.C.  After 29 years working for the USPTO and a total of 34 years working for the government, Stoll retired on December 31, 2011.  He then started his new, second career as a private citizen and all around patent specialist at Drinker Biddle in the firm’s Intellectual Property Group.

In part 1 of my interview with Stoll we discussed his adjusting to life in the private sector, the fact that he doesn’t enjoy the billable hour part of private practice (just like every other attorney I know) and we discussed politics a bit, as well as the U.S. economy and innovation policy.  Part 2 of my interview, which appears below, picks up where we left off discussing Presidential politics and the buzz that engulfs D.C. every 4 years.  We then move on to talk about how innovation drives the U.S. economy and I get his thoughts on why we haven’t seen a great new technology that has spawned an entirely new industry as we have coming out of so many recessions in the past. We then finish part 2 discussing changes to the patent examination process and how to streamline the examination process.



Patents, Politics and Life on K Street – My Interview with Bob Stoll

Posted: Monday, Aug 6, 2012 @ 11:00 pm | Written by Gene Quinn | 3 comments
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Posted in: Gene Quinn, Interviews & Conversations, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patents

Bob Stoll

In early November 2011, Bob Stoll, Commissioner for Patents at the United States Patent and Trademark Office, announced his intention to retire from the agency effective December 31, 2011. Stoll was appointed Commissioner for Patents by Under Secretary Kappos in October 2009, serving a little more than 2 of his 29 years as an employee at the USPTO as Commissioner for Patents.  Bob is currently a partner in on the patent team in the Intellectual Property Group at Drinker Biddle & Reath LLP.

In his 29 years with the Patent and Trademark Office Stoll held several leadership posts including training foreign officials on all aspects of intellectual property (IP), overseeing the Office of Enforcement, and directing federal legislative priorities for the Agency. In his tenure as Commissioner for Patents, Stoll was in charge of implementing initiatives to improve the speed and quality of the patent review process, was instrumental in reducing the patent application backlog, and undertook an initiative to clean out the oldest cases on the USPTO docket, which for a time actually raised some of the key metrics but was objectively the right thing to do. Of course, Stoll was also an integral part of the USPTO team working to get patent reform across the finish line and then in the early implementation efforts of the AIA.

I tried to get Stoll on the record while he was at the USPTO.  I don’t think he dodged me, it just never worked out.  I travel a lot, he travels a lot and when it was convenient for one of us it was never convenient for the other.  In the time I have known Bob we have become friends.  I respect him enormously. Bob’s knowledge of all things patent is extraordinarily deep, and whenever we get together it is always a lively conversation.  So I am extremely happy to bring this on the record interview to you.

In this conversation we talk about life after the USPTO, billable hours, Presidential politics, being on the famed K Street in Washington D.C., the U.S. economy, improvidently granted patents and much more. So without further ado, here is my interview with Bob Stoll.



Justice Scalia: Hardest Decision “Probably a Patent Case”

Posted: Wednesday, Jul 25, 2012 @ 6:56 pm | Written by Gene Quinn | 5 comments
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Posted in: Gene Quinn, Guest Contributors, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patents, US Supreme Court

One week ago, on July 18, 2012, Justice Antonin Scalia of the United States Supreme Court sat down for an interview with Piers Morgan of CNN.  See Scalia interview transcript. During the interview Morgan asked Scalia what his hardest decision has been while on the Supreme Court.  This was the back and forth that ensued:

MORGAN: What has been your hardest decision, do you think?

SCALIA: My hardest?

MORGAN: Yes.

SCALIA: You don’t want to know.

MORGAN: I do want to know.

SCALIA: No, it’s the dullest case imaginable. They — there is — there is no necessary correlation between the difficulty of a decision and its importance. Some of the most insignificant cases have been the hardest. And…

MORGAN: What has been the one that you…

SCALIA: It would probably be a patent case.

You want me to describe it really?

MORGAN: No, I don’t.

(LAUGHTER)

SCALIA: No. Of course. (LAUGHTER)

I thought it might be fun to ask some industry insiders what their guess was as to the unnamed case Justice Scalia was thinking of as the “hardest decision.”  Some of those I asked didn’t offer a guess, but rather took the opportunity to discuss the aforementioned Scalia statements more generally.  Those “musings” will be published tomorrow.