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Posts Tagged ‘ CAFC ’

Patent System Under Attack

Posted: Friday, Nov 22, 2013 @ 8:00 am | Written by Loudon Owen | 25 comments
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Posted in: Federal Circuit, Guest Contributors, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patents, US Supreme Court

Loudon Owen

The United States Patent and Trademark Office exists to protect the rights of American innovators, granting them a license to reap just rewards from their inventions.

But today the U.S. patent system is under attack—in the form of a terribly wrong decision in the very court that was purposely established by Congress in 1982 to support and enforce the protections for patents enshrined in Article One of the U.S. Constitution. The court in question is the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit (CAFC). The bad decision is in Soverain Software LLC vs. Newegg Inc.

In September, the CAFC ruled in favor of Newegg, reversing earlier rulings that Newegg had infringed three patents of Soverain’s relating to Internet commerce technologies.

In doing so, the CAFC disagreed with the facts established by the USPTO when it decided to award Soverain the patents in the first place. It reversed two successive lower court decisions which upheld the USPTO’s position and awarded Soverain both damages and a royalty payment from Newegg.  And its decision conflicted with the exact opposite conclusion from the USPTO in reexaminations of the three patents where the same prior art was considered.



CAFC OKs Transfer Despite Forum Selection Clause

Posted: Sunday, Oct 20, 2013 @ 9:05 am | Written by Gene Quinn | 5 comments
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Posted in: Companies We Follow, Eli Lilly, Federal Circuit, Gene Quinn, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patent Litigation, Patents

In a non-precedential opinion issued October 18, 2013, the Federal Circuit issued a decision that calls into question the overall utility of forum selection clauses in contractual relationships. In fact, Eli Lilly lost its bid to have its dispute with Genentech and City of Hope heard in the Northern District of California despite having a forum selection clause in the governing contract that stated the parties would litigate any dispute in the Northern District of California. See In re Eli Lilly and Co. 



Federal Circuit Puzzles Over Claim Construction Deference

Posted: Wednesday, Sep 25, 2013 @ 10:11 am | Written by AIPLA | 1 Comment »
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Posted in: AIPLA, Federal Circuit, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patent Litigation, Patents

The en banc Federal Circuit on September 13, 2013, heard oral argument on whether to overrule its en banc decision in Cybor Corp. v. FAS Technologies, Inc., 138 F.3d 1448 (Fed. Cir. 1998), and hold that claim construction can involve issues of fact reviewable for clear error, and that it is not entirely an issue of law subject only to de novo review.  Lighting Ballast Control LLC v. Universal Lighting Technologies, Inc., Fed. Cir., No. 2012-1014, 3/15/2013.

Lighting Ballast Control LLC (LBC) owns a patent (5,436,529) on control and protection circuits for electronic lighting ballasts commonly used in fluorescent lighting. The patent includes the term “voltage source means” in the following context: “voltage source means providing a constant or variable magnitude DC voltage between the DC input terminals.” LBC sued Universal Lighting Technologies, Inc. (ULT).

District Court Decision

On appeal is the district court decision that a person of ordinary skill in the art would understand the claim term “voltage source means” to correspond to a rectifier or other voltage supply device. It thus rejected ULT’s argument that the term invokes Section 112 ¶6 and that the claim is invalid for indefiniteness for lack of specific structure in the specification. A Federal Circuit panel reversed in a nonprecedential decision, concluding from a de novo review that “voltage source means” does invoke Section 112 ¶6 and that the claim is invalid for indefiniteness. That panel decision was vacated when the appellate court decided to consider the claim construction issue en banc.



Divided CAFC Finds Computer System Claims Patent Ineligible

Posted: Friday, Sep 13, 2013 @ 1:23 pm | Written by Darrin Auito | 15 comments
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Posted in: Computers, Federal Circuit, Guest Contributors, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patents, Software, Westerman Hattori Daniels & Adrian

Not surprisingly, the decision of the latest Federal Circuit case on software patent eligibility – Accenture Global Services, GMBH v. Guidewire Software, Inc. – could be predicted from the makeup of the CAFC panel.  Judge Lourie, joined by Judge Reyna, issued the majority opinion that the system claims were invalid.  The Court followed the analysis for determining patent eligibility from CLS Bank,717 F.3d 1269 (Fed. Cir. 2013) and affirmed the district court’s finding that the system claims of U.S. Patent No. 7,013,284 (“the ‘284 patent”) were ineligible.  Judge Rader dissented.

Accenture appealed the district court’s holding that system claims 1-7 and method claims 8-22 were invalid as not directed to patentable subject matter.   Interestingly, Accenture only appealed the ruling on the system claims, thus waiving its appeal on the method claims.



Is Soverain Software v. Newegg Supreme Court Bound?

Posted: Wednesday, Sep 4, 2013 @ 1:57 pm | Written by Gene Quinn | 5 comments
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Posted in: Attorneys, Federal Circuit, Gene Quinn, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patent Litigation, Patents

Seth Waxman

Earlier today the United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit issued it latest decision in Soverain Software LLC v. Newegg, Inc. (Fed. Cir., September 4, 2013). This latest decision was necessitated by the limited grant of rehearing ordered on June 13, 2013. The rehearing was granted for the purpose of clarifying the status of claims 34 and 35 of U.S. Patent No. 5,715,314.

The Federal Circuit’s original opinion issued January 22, 2013, and was authored by Judge Neman with Judges Prost and Reyna in agreement. In that January 2013 opinion the Court identified claim 34 as representative of the “shopping cart” claims, and held claim 34 invalid on the ground of obviousness. The parties stated, on petition for rehearing, that the Federal Circuit ruling should have been for claim 35, which would conform to the judgment entered on the jury verdict. But that is where the agreement between the parties ended. Soverain requested further proceedings on the merits, while Newegg proposed that the Federal Circuit correct what they referred to as a “typographical error.” The Federal Circuit ordered additional briefing.

Supreme Court Bound?

Before jumping into the substance of this case, the first thing I noticed was that Seth Waxman of Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr was listed as the lead attorney for Soverain Software in both the petition for rehearing and the ensuing briefs. Robert Wilson of Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan, who specializes in life sciences litigation and appellate matters, was previously the lead attorney for Soverain. Wilson remains on the brief, which is common when the next step toward the Supreme Court is contemplated. But it is hard to imagine that Soverain has brought in Seth Waxman at this late stage if they are not contemplating an appeal to the Supreme Court.



Apple, Samsung Get to Keep Financial Documents Confidential

Posted: Wednesday, Aug 28, 2013 @ 8:00 am | Written by Gene Quinn | 4 comments
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Posted in: Apple, Companies We Follow, Federal Circuit, Gene Quinn, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patent Litigation, Patents, Samsung

Last week the United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit issued a decision in the latest appeal in the Apple/Samsung epic patent battle. See Apple, Inc. v. Samsung Electronics Co. (Fed. Cir., August 23, 2013). In this situation the parties really were not fighting against each other; instead finding themselves arguing on the same side against the decision of the district court to allow sensitive information to be publicly available.

On August 9, 2012, Judge Lucy Koh of the United States District Court for the Northern District of California issued a decision that denied in part the parties’ motion to seal certain filings. In general, Judge Koh sealed information about the parties’ production and supply capacities, confidential source code, third-party market research reports, and the pricing terms of licensing agreements. However, Judge Koh ordered unsealed documents disclosing the parties’ product-specific profits, profit margins, unit sales, revenues, and costs, as well as Apple’s own proprietary market research reports and customer surveys and the non-price terms of licensing agreements.

In her ruling Judge Koh ordered the parties to take an immediate appeal to the Federal Circuit, which occurred on August 13, 2012. The Federal Circuit consolidated the appeal by Apple and the appeal by Samsung, designating Apple as the appellant and Samsung as the cross-appellant. On August 15, 2012, the district court granted a stay pending the final resolution, thus the August 9, 2012 order that sensitive financial information would be made publicly available has been stayed pending disposition of the appeal.



Hamilton Beach Brands v. Sunbeam Products: CAFC Says Manufacturer Supplying Innovator Creates a pre-AIA 102(b) Sale

Posted: Thursday, Aug 15, 2013 @ 3:57 pm | Written by Gene Quinn | 4 comments
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Posted in: Federal Circuit, Gene Quinn, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patentability, Patents

Hamilton Beach and Sunbeam are direct competitors in the small kitchen appliance industry. Both Hamilton Beach and Sunbeam sell competing versions of “slow cookers,” which are electrically heated lidded pots that are used to cook food at low temperatures for long periods. Hamilton Beach sued Sunbeam for infringement of U.S. Patent No. 7,947,928. It was this patent that was at issue in the decision announced by the Federal Circuit yesterday in Hamilton Beach Brands, Inc. v. Sunbeam Products, Inc.. The dispute between the parties centered on whether the district court erred when it granted a motion for summary judgment finding claims 1 and 3-7 of the ’928 patent invalid.

The issue of interest in this case centered around whether there was a pre-AIA 102(b) on-sale bar. You might expect such issues not to be worthy of a Federal Circuit precedential opinion, but there was an issue with respect to whether there really was a contract in place before the critical date, but also an issue about whether the on-sale bar could apply when the offer for sale was from a Hamilton Beach supplier to Hamilton Beach themselves. The short answer is that the Federal Circuit, over a dissent by Judge Reyna, determined that there was a triggering offer for sale and it is of no concern whether the offer for sale was initiated by a supplier who was making the units at the request of the patent owner.



Senate Confirms Raymond Chen to Federal Circuit

Posted: Thursday, Aug 1, 2013 @ 5:52 pm | Written by Gene Quinn | 1 Comment »
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Posted in: Congress, Federal Circuit, Gene Quinn, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patents, USPTO

Judge Raymond Chen of the United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit.

Earlier today, at precisely 12:27pm ET, by a vote of 97 – 0, the United States Senate confirmed Raymond T. Chen to be a judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit. Chen was nominated by President Barack Obama on February 7, 2013.

Prior to becoming the newest member of the Federal Circuit, Chen was the Deputy General Counsel for Intellectual Property Law and Solicitor at the United States Patent and Trademark Office. In this role, he defended the Under Secretary of Commerce and Director of the USPTO and the agency in court. By all accounts he was also a trusted senior member of the USPTO senior management team.

Prior to becoming Solicitor and Deputy General Counsel at the USPTO, Chen was an Associate Solicitor for 10 years. In this capacity he represented the USPTO’s decisions in federal court, briefing and arguing numerous cases before the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit.