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Posts Tagged ‘ CAFC ’

Supreme Court Refuses Soverain v. Newegg

Posted: Monday, Jan 13, 2014 @ 9:46 pm | Written by Gene Quinn | 27 comments
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Posted in: Anti-patent Nonsense, Federal Circuit, Gene Quinn, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patents, US Supreme Court

Earlier today the United States Supreme Court declined to accept Soverain v. Newegg, which will allow one of the more pronounced travesties of justice to stand as if the Federal Circuit got it correct in the first place. Soverain President Katharine Wolanyk said, “We are obviously disappointed by the Supreme Court’s denial of our Cert. petition, and are troubled by the precedent it leaves in place.”

Everyone who has objectively looked at the case knows that the Federal Circuit made a terrible mistake, but now that won’t be corrected and a serial patent infringer that has made a business practice of ignoring patent rights gets to use the Soverain technology for free. And just when you think things couldn’t get more strange, Newegg makes a bizarre comment with misogynistic undertones.

“The witch is dead, hurray,” said Lee Cheng, Newegg’s Chief Legal Officer. It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to realize that Cheng is calling Wolanyk a witch. Of course he will deny such a charge and he and his supporters will proclaim their innocence. But this is no different than liberals working “weight” into every comment or tweet they make about New Jersey Governor Chris Christie. This type of not so subtle dig is what those familiar with Newegg have come to expect. It is this juvenile, over the top, holier-than-thou attitude that Newegg personifies.



The CAFC Got it Wrong in Soverain v Newegg

Posted: Monday, Dec 30, 2013 @ 11:19 am | Written by Dr. Lawrence Stewart | 15 comments
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Posted in: Federal Circuit, Guest Contributors, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patents

Back in 1994 I was a member of the founding team of Open Market, an early eCommerce software company.

We started work in our basements in April 1994 to solve the challenges of online shopping, and on October 24, 1994 launched our product the “Open Marketplace”.  That same day we filed a patent application, which eventually issued in 1998 as U.S. Patent 5,715,314, titled “Network Sales System”.  The Wall Street Journal published two insightful articles about Open Market’s patents at the time:  Open Market Receives Patents for Internet-Commerce Software and Patents Lift Open Market As Observers Guess Their Worth.

This posting isn’t about eCommerce particularly.  Win Treese and I wrote a book on that subject, called Designing Systems for Internet Commerce.  In two editions, it sold over 20,000 copies, was used for a number of college and business school courses, and was even translated into Chinese.  This post is about the ‘314 patent, which is sometimes referred to as the “Shopping Cart Patent”.



Defending the Federal Circuit, Again, on Software Patents

Posted: Wednesday, Dec 18, 2013 @ 2:06 pm | Written by Gene Quinn | 19 comments
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Posted in: Congress, Federal Circuit, Gene Quinn, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patentability, Patents, Software, US Supreme Court

When it comes to the history of software patents it seems that everyone believes they are an expert. Unfortunately, few in the popular press actually take the time to get the story correct. In fact, there is a popular misconception in media that the Federal Circuit was the court that first authorized software patents. I have dealt with this nonsense in the past, and now have to deal with it once again. None other than the Wall Street Journal has published an article on the topic that is simply fiction.

The clearly erroneous Wall Street Journal article in question was published on December 15, 2013, under the title Jimmy Carter’s Costly Patent Mistake. The article, written by Gordon Crovitz, seems to take the position that patents stifle innovation, although Crovitz thesis is not explicitly stated. It would be erroneous enough to state that patents stifle innovation when all of the evidence is to the contrary, but that isn’t the major Crovitz sin in this article, although it is a whopper of a lie often told by patent critics.

Before proceeding, allow me to state what should otherwise be obvious: if patents stifle innovation you would expect run-away innovation in places where there is no patent system, but that isn’t what you see. You see extraordinary poverty, no economy and zero innovation where there are not patent rights. Likewise, you see economies established, domestic innovation and innovation from overseas flowing into countries that adopt  strong patent rights. Furthermore, the entire point of a patent system is to grant exclusive rights that force creative, inventive and entrepreneurial individuals who are blocked to design around, which is exactly what happens. Designing around patents leads to enormous leaps in innovation. See Forfeiting Our Future Over Irrational Fear of Software PatentsAnd for those who don’t get it and erroneously state that we are seeing historic levels of patent litigation, read your history. There were close to 600 patent litigations associated with the invention of the telephone, and smart phone litigation has been but a small fraction of that number. Furthermore, the smartphone as we know it came out in 2007. In the past six years have the over abundance of patents stopped smartphone innovation? Hardly, and everyone who is at all honest knows that to be 100% true. So why the pretending about patents stopping innovation? Obviously there is real patent hatred and critics, like Crovitz, simply ignore facts and prefer their own brand of fantasy over truth.

As ridiculous as it is to suggest that patents stifle innovation, this ill-defined Crovitz thesis isn’t the major issue with the fiction published by the Wall Street Journal. There is objective and verifiable error in his article that even those with an agenda will have to admit.



Soverainv. Newegg: Not an Ordinary Obviousness Dispute

Posted: Thursday, Dec 12, 2013 @ 7:45 am | Written by Gene Quinn | 24 comments
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Posted in: Federal Circuit, Gene Quinn, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patentability, Patents, US Supreme Court

On October 16, 2013, Soverain Software submitted its Petition for Certiorari to the United States Supreme Court, seeking a review of the United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit in Soverain Software LLC v. Newegg (January 22, 2013). The seeming late filing of the Petition for Certiorari was due to the fact that a  limited grant of rehearing was ordered by the Federal Circuit on June 13, 2013. The rehearing was for the purpose of clarifying the status of claims 34 and 35 of U.S. Patent No. 5,715,314. The other patents at issue in the case are U.S. Patent No. 5,909,492 and U.S. Patent No. 7,272,639.

The original January 2013 opinion was authored by Judge Neman with Judges Prost and Reyna in agreement. In that opinion the Court identified claim 34 as representative of the “shopping cart” claims, and held claim 34 invalid on the ground of obviousness. The parties stated, on petition for rehearing, that the Federal Circuit ruling should have been for claim 35, which would conform to the judgment entered on the jury verdict. Ultimately, the rehearing was not successful and claim 35, like claim 34, was ruled invalid because it was obvious. See Soverain Software LLC v. Newegg, Inc. (Fed. Cir., September 4, 2013).

The Newegg brief in opposition to Soverain’s Petition for Certiorari was due on November 18, 2o13, but Newegg’s attorney requested an extension until Thursday, December 12, 2013, so we await the filing of Newegg’s opposition brief. I have been told that Soverain plans to file a reply to whatever Newegg files, so it will be some time before we know whether the Supreme Court will take this important case.

The Pioneering Technology

Before diving into why this case matters and everyone should pay close attention, allow me to point out that the technology involved in this case is THE original shopping cart technology. In fact, the ‘314 patent matured from a patent application that was filed on October 24, 1994. Despite what you may have heard, this is not an example of a bad patent, nor is it something that wasn’t new or was legitimately obvious at the time it was invented, which would have been some meaningful time before October 24, 1994. This is an example of a pioneering invention that came about at the dawn of Internet as we know it today.  The fact that it is ancient in Internet terms does not mean that the claims are bad, it merely means that the innovation embodied in the patent is fundamentally important. Indeed, the Soverain’s enterprise software product has been in use for nearly 18 years, and has been used by over 1,000 customers in over 25 countries, including companies such as Time-Warner, AT&T, Sony, Disney, BusinessWeek and Reuters.



Patent System Under Attack

Posted: Friday, Nov 22, 2013 @ 8:00 am | Written by Loudon Owen | 25 comments
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Posted in: Federal Circuit, Guest Contributors, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patents, US Supreme Court

Loudon Owen

The United States Patent and Trademark Office exists to protect the rights of American innovators, granting them a license to reap just rewards from their inventions.

But today the U.S. patent system is under attack—in the form of a terribly wrong decision in the very court that was purposely established by Congress in 1982 to support and enforce the protections for patents enshrined in Article One of the U.S. Constitution. The court in question is the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit (CAFC). The bad decision is in Soverain Software LLC vs. Newegg Inc.

In September, the CAFC ruled in favor of Newegg, reversing earlier rulings that Newegg had infringed three patents of Soverain’s relating to Internet commerce technologies.

In doing so, the CAFC disagreed with the facts established by the USPTO when it decided to award Soverain the patents in the first place. It reversed two successive lower court decisions which upheld the USPTO’s position and awarded Soverain both damages and a royalty payment from Newegg.  And its decision conflicted with the exact opposite conclusion from the USPTO in reexaminations of the three patents where the same prior art was considered.



CAFC OKs Transfer Despite Forum Selection Clause

Posted: Sunday, Oct 20, 2013 @ 9:05 am | Written by Gene Quinn | 5 comments
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Posted in: Companies We Follow, Eli Lilly, Federal Circuit, Gene Quinn, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patent Litigation, Patents

In a non-precedential opinion issued October 18, 2013, the Federal Circuit issued a decision that calls into question the overall utility of forum selection clauses in contractual relationships. In fact, Eli Lilly lost its bid to have its dispute with Genentech and City of Hope heard in the Northern District of California despite having a forum selection clause in the governing contract that stated the parties would litigate any dispute in the Northern District of California. See In re Eli Lilly and Co. 



Federal Circuit Puzzles Over Claim Construction Deference

Posted: Wednesday, Sep 25, 2013 @ 10:11 am | Written by AIPLA | 1 Comment »
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Posted in: AIPLA, Federal Circuit, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patent Litigation, Patents

The en banc Federal Circuit on September 13, 2013, heard oral argument on whether to overrule its en banc decision in Cybor Corp. v. FAS Technologies, Inc., 138 F.3d 1448 (Fed. Cir. 1998), and hold that claim construction can involve issues of fact reviewable for clear error, and that it is not entirely an issue of law subject only to de novo review.  Lighting Ballast Control LLC v. Universal Lighting Technologies, Inc., Fed. Cir., No. 2012-1014, 3/15/2013.

Lighting Ballast Control LLC (LBC) owns a patent (5,436,529) on control and protection circuits for electronic lighting ballasts commonly used in fluorescent lighting. The patent includes the term “voltage source means” in the following context: “voltage source means providing a constant or variable magnitude DC voltage between the DC input terminals.” LBC sued Universal Lighting Technologies, Inc. (ULT).

District Court Decision

On appeal is the district court decision that a person of ordinary skill in the art would understand the claim term “voltage source means” to correspond to a rectifier or other voltage supply device. It thus rejected ULT’s argument that the term invokes Section 112 ¶6 and that the claim is invalid for indefiniteness for lack of specific structure in the specification. A Federal Circuit panel reversed in a nonprecedential decision, concluding from a de novo review that “voltage source means” does invoke Section 112 ¶6 and that the claim is invalid for indefiniteness. That panel decision was vacated when the appellate court decided to consider the claim construction issue en banc.



Divided CAFC Finds Computer System Claims Patent Ineligible

Posted: Friday, Sep 13, 2013 @ 1:23 pm | Written by Darrin Auito | 15 comments
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Posted in: Computers, Federal Circuit, Guest Contributors, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patents, Software, Westerman Hattori Daniels & Adrian

Not surprisingly, the decision of the latest Federal Circuit case on software patent eligibility – Accenture Global Services, GMBH v. Guidewire Software, Inc. – could be predicted from the makeup of the CAFC panel.  Judge Lourie, joined by Judge Reyna, issued the majority opinion that the system claims were invalid.  The Court followed the analysis for determining patent eligibility from CLS Bank,717 F.3d 1269 (Fed. Cir. 2013) and affirmed the district court’s finding that the system claims of U.S. Patent No. 7,013,284 (“the ‘284 patent”) were ineligible.  Judge Rader dissented.

Accenture appealed the district court’s holding that system claims 1-7 and method claims 8-22 were invalid as not directed to patentable subject matter.   Interestingly, Accenture only appealed the ruling on the system claims, thus waiving its appeal on the method claims.



Is Soverain Software v. Newegg Supreme Court Bound?

Posted: Wednesday, Sep 4, 2013 @ 1:57 pm | Written by Gene Quinn | 5 comments
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Posted in: Attorneys, Federal Circuit, Gene Quinn, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patent Litigation, Patents

Seth Waxman

Earlier today the United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit issued it latest decision in Soverain Software LLC v. Newegg, Inc. (Fed. Cir., September 4, 2013). This latest decision was necessitated by the limited grant of rehearing ordered on June 13, 2013. The rehearing was granted for the purpose of clarifying the status of claims 34 and 35 of U.S. Patent No. 5,715,314.

The Federal Circuit’s original opinion issued January 22, 2013, and was authored by Judge Neman with Judges Prost and Reyna in agreement. In that January 2013 opinion the Court identified claim 34 as representative of the “shopping cart” claims, and held claim 34 invalid on the ground of obviousness. The parties stated, on petition for rehearing, that the Federal Circuit ruling should have been for claim 35, which would conform to the judgment entered on the jury verdict. But that is where the agreement between the parties ended. Soverain requested further proceedings on the merits, while Newegg proposed that the Federal Circuit correct what they referred to as a “typographical error.” The Federal Circuit ordered additional briefing.

Supreme Court Bound?

Before jumping into the substance of this case, the first thing I noticed was that Seth Waxman of Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr was listed as the lead attorney for Soverain Software in both the petition for rehearing and the ensuing briefs. Robert Wilson of Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan, who specializes in life sciences litigation and appellate matters, was previously the lead attorney for Soverain. Wilson remains on the brief, which is common when the next step toward the Supreme Court is contemplated. But it is hard to imagine that Soverain has brought in Seth Waxman at this late stage if they are not contemplating an appeal to the Supreme Court.



Apple, Samsung Get to Keep Financial Documents Confidential

Posted: Wednesday, Aug 28, 2013 @ 8:00 am | Written by Gene Quinn | 4 comments
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Posted in: Apple, Companies We Follow, Federal Circuit, Gene Quinn, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patent Litigation, Patents, Samsung

Last week the United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit issued a decision in the latest appeal in the Apple/Samsung epic patent battle. See Apple, Inc. v. Samsung Electronics Co. (Fed. Cir., August 23, 2013). In this situation the parties really were not fighting against each other; instead finding themselves arguing on the same side against the decision of the district court to allow sensitive information to be publicly available.

On August 9, 2012, Judge Lucy Koh of the United States District Court for the Northern District of California issued a decision that denied in part the parties’ motion to seal certain filings. In general, Judge Koh sealed information about the parties’ production and supply capacities, confidential source code, third-party market research reports, and the pricing terms of licensing agreements. However, Judge Koh ordered unsealed documents disclosing the parties’ product-specific profits, profit margins, unit sales, revenues, and costs, as well as Apple’s own proprietary market research reports and customer surveys and the non-price terms of licensing agreements.

In her ruling Judge Koh ordered the parties to take an immediate appeal to the Federal Circuit, which occurred on August 13, 2012. The Federal Circuit consolidated the appeal by Apple and the appeal by Samsung, designating Apple as the appellant and Samsung as the cross-appellant. On August 15, 2012, the district court granted a stay pending the final resolution, thus the August 9, 2012 order that sensitive financial information would be made publicly available has been stayed pending disposition of the appeal.