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Posts Tagged ‘ Chief Judge Michel ’

Amici Urge Caution on Software Patents at the Supreme Court

Posted: Thursday, Mar 13, 2014 @ 12:54 pm | Written by Gene Quinn & Steve Brachmann | 22 comments
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Posted in: Computers, Gene Quinn, Guest Contributors, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patentability, Patents, Software, Steve Brachmann, US Supreme Court

Former CAFC Chief Judge Paul Michel filed an amicus brief in Alice v. CLS Bank.

In a few weeks, the Supreme Court of the United States will begin to hear arguments in Alice Corp. v. CLS Bank International. This case involves the very basics of U.S. patent law, namely what is considered patent eligible, and will have wide-reaching effects in the American technological sector. The case before the Court will ask it to decide upon the patent eligibility of software based on the most foundational aspects of patent law: Section 101 of U.S. Code Title 35. If a category of innovation is not patent eligible under Section 101 it does not matter whether the invention is highly useful, new and non-obvious. In fact, an invention can even be pioneering and revolutionary and not deserve a patent if it is deemed patent ineligible under Section 101. Because a determination that an entire area of technological pursuit can be deemed patent ineligible under Section 101 historically that has been only infrequently used so as to not unnecessarily kill innovative developments in their infancy.

In recent years, however, the Supreme Court has shown far more willingness to find things patent ineligible, which is a disturbing trend. In fact, In Mayo v. Prometheus, the Supreme Court conflated Section 101 with 102 to say that something that a patent claim that does not related to a law of nature was still nevertheless patent ineligible as a law of nature because the additional steps added that made it different than a law of nature were merely conventional. Up until Mayo such an analysis had been mandated by the Supreme Court to occur under Section 102. Indeed, the statute the Supreme Court ostensibly must follow requires novelty and conventionality to be addressed under 102. Thus, as the result of Mayo, and the Supreme Court’s decision in Myriad, there is great concern about the future of patent eligibility because it seems the Supreme Court now seems to prefer to find inventions patent ineligible without the mandated statutory analysis under 102, 103 and 112.

Software innovations are ubiquitous in our country, in use by machines and systems from consumer devices on to basic utility grids. There are numerous individuals who are keenly interested in the outcome of this case, and many have volunteered to participate and provide their insight, opinions and arguments to the Supreme Court. With this in mind we wanted to share some of the most informative amicus curiae briefs that have been filed with the U.S. Supreme Court. We have already published articles about the IBM amicus brief, the brief filed by the Solicitor General and the Trading Technologies amici brief joined by another 45 companies. Now as a part of our ongoing coverage of this case, we’ll look at what several other interested parties have to say about the patentability of software, and how our country’s patent system should be treating this issue.



Industry Leaders, Judges to Discuss Patent Litigation Reform

Posted: Tuesday, Jan 14, 2014 @ 8:00 am | Written by Gene Quinn | 2 comments
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Posted in: Gene Quinn, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patent Litigation, Patent Reform, Patent Trolls, Patents

Phil Johnson (left) and Judge Michel (right) will be on the panel at this Sedona Conference. Shown here at the 2013 IPO Inventor of the Year ceremony.

Next Wednesday, The Sedona Conference will present a webinar that will take a look at an important, topical issue facing innovators – is legislative patent litigation reform necessary or can the Courts handle what some observe are abusive litigation tactics. On January 22, 2014, Patent Litigation Best Practices: A Matter for Congress or for Bench and Bar? will address the issue with an all-star faculty of leading practitioners in the field.  The faculty includes former Federal Circuit Chief Judge Paul R. Michel, as well as current Federal Circuit Judge Kathleen O’Malley.  Tina Chappell of Intel Corporation, Philip S. Johnson of Johnson & Johnson, and Alexander Rogers of Qualcomm will also offer their perspectives and insights as faculty members.

Patents and patent reform has been in the news, even the popular press, on an increasing basis. The issue of patents generally and patent litigation specifically has been the subject of intense debate over the last 8 years. Congress passed the America Invents Act (AIA) in 2011, with the bill being signed into law by President Obama on September 16, 2011. The overhaul of U.S. patent law was extraordinary, but not all of the parties involved were happy. Some thought the law went too far in some ways, others thought the law did not go far enough. Despite the AIA being the most significant change to patent laws since at least 1952, Congress is considering further reforms again, with the House of Representatives already passing the Innovation Act (HR 3309). Companion legislation in the Senate is likely to move forward during Q1 2014.



Judge Michel: Patent Reform Bills Would Weaken Patent System

Posted: Wednesday, Oct 16, 2013 @ 2:27 pm | Written by Olivia Luk | 12 comments
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Posted in: Guest Contributors, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patent Litigation, Patent Reform, Patents

Left to Right: DePaul Law Professor Josh Sarnoff, Chief Judge James Holderman (N.D. Ill.), Ray Niro, Chief judge Michel (CAFC, ret.), DePaul Law Professor Roberta Kwall.

Former Federal Circuit Chief Judge Paul Michel gave an invigorating speech at the DePaul University College of Law Center for Intellectual Property Law & Information Technology (CIPLIT®) on October 15, 2013 at the 15th Annual Niro Distinguished Intellectual Property Lecture on the topic “How to Retain Patent Enforcement While Reforming It – Judges and Counsel Should Manage Infringement Suits, not Congress.”

To an evenly divided room of practitioners and law students, Judge Michel urged practitioners to take action against Congress’ incorrect understanding of the patent system.  Judge Michel explained legislators are proposing bills because they are being heavily lobbied by a small (but powerful and well-funded) coalition of companies.  He highlighted the common problem with the nine active bills currently before Congress.  If passed, the bills separately and together would weaken the patent system; not strengthen it.  None of these current bills would address the problems with the current patent system: litigation is slow, complicated and unpredictable.  The bills, however, would make litigation slower, more complicated and less predictable. In short, congress’ solution would add to the problem.



A Night at the Smithsonian, Patent Style

Posted: Wednesday, Dec 12, 2012 @ 3:49 pm | Written by Gene Quinn | 1 Comment »
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Posted in: Gene Quinn, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patents

Alex Kipman, National Inventor of the Year.

On Monday the Intellectual Property Owners Education Foundation held its popular annual event simply titled PTO Day, which started early in the morning and ran throughout the day. PTO Day is, however, not the only event on the IPO calendar for December. After the close of the conference proceedings and as afternoon turns to evening a who’s who of the patent and innovation communities don black-ties (for the men) and elegant gowns (for the ladies).

One of the highlights of the year in such circles is the awarding of the National Inventor of the Year Award at a dinner ceremony in Washington, DC. This year the Awards Ceremony was hosted at the old Patent Office building, which today houses the Smithsonian American Art Museum and the National Portrait Gallery. If you have never been to this venue it is, in my opinion, one of the finest venues in all of Washington, DC for such an event. Of course, the fact that it was a first class, extraordinarily well done event only added to the evening. The meal was a fabulous shrimp appetizer, followed by filet mignon and an incredibly rich chocolate cake and ice cream for desert. The wine flowed throughout the evening, and everyone had a great time.



All In! Doubling Down on Erroneous Attacks on the Federal Circuit

Posted: Friday, Oct 5, 2012 @ 1:52 pm | Written by Gene Quinn | 18 comments
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Posted in: Anti-patent Nonsense, Federal Circuit, Gene Quinn, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patents, Software, US Supreme Court

On Sunday, September 30, 2012, Timothy Lee of Ars Technica wrote a terribly researched and demonstrably erroneous article attacking the Federal Circuit titled How a rogue appeals court wrecked the patent system. The article is a cheap shot, factually inaccurate and just plain embarrassing.  Lee concludes the Federal Circuit is at the heart of all problems in the patent system, which is, itself, simply not true.  Of course, conclusions are not evidence and if he could have backed up what he was saying with any kind of factual, true information then it would have been a matter of opinion.   Instead, he was wrong about pretty much everything he wrote.

I challenged Lee’s article on Wednesday, October 3, 2012, in an article titled Lies, Damn Lies and Media Hatred of Patents (and the CAFC). This prompted Lee to come out swinging again, this time on Forbes.com in an article titled The Federal Circuit, Not the Supreme Court, Legalized Software Patents. Instead of apologizing like he should have done for writing about something he clearly doesn’t understand AND for getting it miserably wrong, Lee doubled down. Well — sort of.



Lies, Damn Lies and Media Hatred of Patents (and the CAFC)

Posted: Wednesday, Oct 3, 2012 @ 6:15 am | Written by Gene Quinn | 51 comments
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Posted in: Anti-patent Nonsense, Federal Circuit, Gene Quinn, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patents

If most reporters knew anything about patents they would be embarrassed to have their names professionally associated with the drivel they try and pass off as news. But media ignorance of patents specifically and intellectual property generally is nothing new.  Errors are so easy to document that it is virtually impossible to take them seriously.  But then every once in a while an article crosses the line even for a know-nothing anti-patent zealot masquerading as a journalist.

Indeed, few articles have struck a nerve in me quite the way that a recent Ars Technica article did.  The article is titled How a rogue appeals court wrecked the patent system. It is a cheap shot, factually inaccurate and embarrassingly incorrect “news” story that concludes the Federal Circuit is at the heart of all the problems in the patent system. A real Pinocchio tale.

How did the media get to such a low place, where sensationalism means more than truth? Once upon a time the media was viewed as a bastion of truth and integrity.  They were viewed by the Founding Fathers as the virtual fourth branch of government.  A free media would offer checks and balances against the three co-equal branches of the federal government, and by keeping the people informed would keep government in check.  Oh how the mighty have fallen. There is hardly any such thing any more as a fair and objective media outlet.  Simply put, truth doesn’t matter to the media. That which passes for news is full of errors, inaccuracies and outright lies. The public is being deceived, and in our little space the deception seems to be part of a coordinated effort to destroy the patent system as we know it.



Industry Insiders Make Patent Wishes for 2012

Posted: Monday, Jan 2, 2012 @ 7:15 am | Written by Gene Quinn | 5 comments
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Posted in: Guest Contributors, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patents

It is that time of the year where we all start to look ahead to the new year, perhaps making some New Year resolutions that are sure to last for at least a few days. Over the past several years I write an article titled “Patent Wishes,” and two years ago I contacted a number of my industry contacts to ask them what they wish for moving into the New Year. See Industry Insiders Make Patent Wishes for 2010.

With that in mind I once again contacted some of my friends to get them to go on the record with their patent and innovation related wishes for 2012. I was lucky enough to get a number of very thoughtful responses from individuals with a variety of experiences.

So without further ado, here are the wishes of some industry insiders for 2012.  Please feel free to add your own wishes to the comments, and stay tuned for my annual Patent Wishes article where I write about my own wishes for the year ahead.



A Special Thank You to Our Guest Contributors!

Posted: Friday, Dec 2, 2011 @ 5:13 pm | Written by Gene Quinn | 3 comments
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Posted in: Blogs & Websites, Gene Quinn, Guest Contributors, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles

As you may have seen, IPWatchdog.com has been named to the ABA Blawg 100, which recognizes the top 100 blogs on the Internet written by lawyers for lawyers.  This marks the third year in a row we have been honored by the American Bar Association Journal as a top 100 blog.

Now the voting begins. Last year we were voted the top IP Law blog and greatly appreciate the support we received.  Once again this year we are in the same category — IP Law — as is Professor Dennis Crouch’s widely popular PatentlyO blog.  If you are inclined to vote for us we would once again greatly appreciate your support.

Over the years IPWatchdog.com has continued to try and add additional perspectives from a wide variety of guest contributors, ranging from well respected practicing attorneys and agents to high profile academics to inventors and pro-patent lobbyists. It is hard to imagine providing such depth of analysis on such an array of topics without having truly wonderful guest authors.  So we take this moment to say a very special thank you and to shine the spotlight on them. Each deserve to share in any recognition of IPWatchdog.com.  While I am loathe to single any guests out I would be remiss if I didn’t separately thank both Beth Hutchens (10 contributions) and Eric Guttag (9 contributions)!

Without further ado, here are the guest contributors in alphabetical order, along with their contributions for 2011.