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Posts Tagged ‘ innovation ’

Fun in the Sun Patent Style: Let’s Go Surfing Now!

Posted: Thursday, Jul 25, 2013 @ 8:03 pm | Written by Steve Brachmann | No Comments »
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Posted in: Guest Contributors, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patents, Steve Brachmann, Technology & Innovation, USPTO

For many summer weather enthusiasts, this time of year is the best for getting out on the water and surfing the largest waves they can find. Surfboards have been around since the 1940s and have grown in popularity as a summer pastime in coastal areas.

Although mostly a hobby, surfboards have been an intriguing focus for technology developers. In an earlier Summer Fun article at IPWatchdog, we took a look at a surfboard that collects solar energy to generate electricity. Sustainable surfboard manufacturing has been a focus, as evidenced by this SurferToday.com article that discusses how styrofoam packaging for TVs and other appliances can be reformed into surfboards. Some companies are even developing 3D printers capable of printing custom surfboards for many customers.

Today in IPWatchdog’s Summer 2013 Fun series, in  honor of the ongoing U.S. Open of Surfing in Huntington Beach, California, we’re featuring some of the most interesting new patent applications and issued patents related to surfing. Some of these newly devised innovations are designed to help a surfer save their physical energy. One patent application describes a new powered surfboard with a detachable chair for riding far out into a body of water. Another issued patent protects an attachable hard edge that can improve the performance of inflatable surfboards, which are easier to transport. A new four-pointed tail design from a patent application would improve a surfer’s speed and control on the water.



Toyota Celebrates Inventors, Patents in Award Ceremony

Posted: Friday, Jul 12, 2013 @ 10:53 am | Written by Steve Brachmann | No Comments »
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Posted in: Companies We Follow, Guest Contributors, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patents, Steve Brachmann, Technology & Innovation

Toyota Motor Corporation, headquartered in Toyota, Japan, is an industry leader for research and development in the automotive industry. The multinational corporation has a strong American presence as well; the Toyota Technical Center is located in Ann Arbor, MI. Recently, the Technical Center held a ceremony to celebrate the corporation’s top inventors for the past year.

The corporation and its subsidiaries were awarded 1,491 patents in 2012, the most for any automobile manufacturer according to the Intellectual Property Owners Association. Of particular note were inventors Minjuan Zhang, a manager at the Toyota Research Institute NA, and Charan Lota, manager at the Toyota Technical Center. Both of these inventors earned, separately, their 20th issued patents during 2012.

Today in IPWatchdog’s Companies We Follow series, we’re taking a look at recent Toyota patents to celebrate this incredible output of technological innovation from the Japanese car maker. Two patents we feature here include Zhang and Lota as part of the development team. One patent protects a new multi-layer exterior for vehicles that reflects a wider range of light, providing a vehicle better protection from damaging sunlight rays. Another patent protects a smart calendar system that can inform onboard GPS routing based on regular errands.



Surfboards and Umbrellas: Solar Power Patents for Summer

Posted: Wednesday, Jul 10, 2013 @ 7:45 am | Written by Steve Brachmann | 16 comments
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Posted in: Guest Contributors, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patents, Steve Brachmann, Technology & Innovation, USPTO

Fig. 1 from US Patent No. 4,415,133.

The hotter months have arrived, which means that it’s the time of the year that we feel solar energy the most. In fact, the heat and longer days make it perfect to enjoy some of the better things that Mother Nature has to offer.

Inventors have been filing for patents regarding solar powered items for at least several decades. Patents issued by the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office during the early ‘80s show how inventors have used solar energy to power lighting systems (US Patent No. 4,384,317) and even for the propulsion of aircraft through the sky (US Patent No. 4,415,133). In the 1990s, more interesting applications for solar energy use in outdoor entertainment can be seen, such as this patent protecting a solar-powered hot dog cooker (US Patent No. 5,054,467).

Today at IPWatchdog, as we continue our Summer 2013 series, we take a look at some of the patents and applications regarding the application of solar energy to improve outdoor summer activities. A few patent applications give us an insight to some of the intriguing uses of solar energy we might see someday in our own backyards. One application describes an umbrella table capable of storing electricity and sending it to electrical outlets on the table. Another application is for a grill canopy with solar-powered lighting displaying downward from the fabric top. A third application would protect a solar powered outdoor lamp with a more stable base for non-permeable ground settings.



U.S. Ranks #5 in 2013 Global Innovation Index

Posted: Monday, Jul 1, 2013 @ 2:36 pm | Written by Gene Quinn | 1 Comment »
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Posted in: Gene Quinn, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patents, Technology & Innovation, US Economy, WIPO

Earlier today Cornell University, INSEAD, and the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) released the rankings for the 2013 Global Innovation Index. Switzerland and Sweden remain #1 and #2 respectively, but the United States jumped 5 places to #5.

According to the report, the United States benefited from a strong education base, with many top-ranked universities. Additionally, over the last year the U.S. has seen significant increases in software spending and employment in knowledge-intensive industries. The U.S. was last in the top 5 of the Global Innovation Index in 2009, when it placed #1.

There was also good news for innovation in general, which is alive and well despite the global economic crisis, which drags on. The report explains that “[r]esearch and development spending levels are surpassing 2008 levels in most countries and successful local hubs are thriving.”



Fun in the Sun Patent Style – A Conversation with Wake Board Innovator Glen Duff

Posted: Monday, Jul 1, 2013 @ 8:45 am | Written by Gene Quinn | 2 comments
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Posted in: Gene Quinn, Interviews & Conversations, Inventors Information, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patents

July is the first full month of summer and to kick summer off we will be profiling some fun summer innovations as part of our Summer 2013 series.

Up first is a very special invention for me. The inventor is Glen Duff, who has been a client of mine for the last 5 years. Over the past year we were able to get Glen and his team their first patent on the Zup™ Board. See U.S. Patent No. 8292681, titled Water recreation device.

The Zup™ is perhaps the most cool and innovative wake board you have ever seen. There are a number of other patent applications pending, trademark applications pending and ongoing research and development for future products. The Zup™ is special because literally anyone can ride the board and participate in the fun. I knew that Glen was onto something when he showed me a video of an early prototype in use years ago. There was a giant fellow — 6’8″ and easily 290 pounds — who managed to get up on the board with ease. I thought to myself, “that shouldn’t happen!” Being a big guy myself I understand how difficult, if not nearly impossible, it is to get up on a traditional wake board. In that same video I also saw an elderly grandmother get up on the board. Neither size nor upper body strength mattered. It was then I knew Glen had something special.

Glen will easily be one of my most successful clients ever when all is said and done and we are telling our stories at our retirement parties. An inventor on several patents prior to his entry into the wake board market, Glen has simply done everything right along the way. He has listened to advice and has surrounded himself with an all-star advisory group of industry insiders who are very optimistic about the likely future success. Thus, this is a story of growing success, but also one of perseverance and commitment. It illustrates the importance of moving forward with a patent position to secure rights that can be build upon, and how critical it is to surround yourself with people knowledgeable about the industry. As Glen explains below in our interview he managed to connect with several key industry leaders who helped open doors for the Zup™ and who are on his advisory board.



Don’t Write About What You Don’t Understand

Posted: Monday, Jul 1, 2013 @ 7:35 am | Written by Kelli Proia | 5 comments
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Posted in: Guest Contributors, Inventors Information, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patents, Technology & Innovation

To all the journalists, reporters, mainstream technology and business bloggers, and other well meaning but seriously misinformed writers:

PLEASE DO NOT SPEAK ON INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY MATTERS THAT YOU DON’T REALLY UNDERSTAND!

Before you decide to bash the United States patent system or teach Patents 101 in 300 words or less, please acknowledge your limited knowledge of the subject matter.   Please tell your audience that your article is only part of a much larger story that can’t be covered in a single column or blog post.  Above all, please do not encourage them to take actions that could have serious legal consequences.

You are telling an incomplete story.

What you don’t know, and what you aren’t reporting on, is an important piece that’s missing from mainstream media coverage of today’s intellectual property issues.  And that is a problem.



University of California Improves Diagnosis, Treatment for Arthritis

Posted: Friday, Jun 28, 2013 @ 12:36 pm | Written by Steve Brachmann | No Comments »
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Posted in: Guest Contributors, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patents, Steve Brachmann, Technology & Innovation, USPTO

The University of California public university system proves over and over again that academic research centers can be major contributors to the intellectual property industry. In 2011, the university states that 1,581 new inventions were developed by employees of the educational system, 58 of which led directly to technology startups. Since 1985, the university system has developed its own patent policy regarding inventions developed within university facilities.

This week at IPWatchdog’s Companies We Follow series, we decide to leave the private sector and check out the recent patent applications and issued patents assigned to the University of California. This academic research system is involved with the research and development of computer, medical and energy technologies, among others.

As many of the patents and applications we feature below indicate, the University of California is a major developer of medical technologies. A patent issued by the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office protects a system of developing transplantable kidney tissues from embryonic structures. Two other patent applications would protect a method of making synthetic red blood cells and improvements to current methods of detecting arthritis in patients.



What Should be Patentable? – A Proposal for Determining the Existence of Statutory Subject Matter Under 35 U.S.C. Section 101

Posted: Thursday, Jun 27, 2013 @ 9:45 am | Written by Andrew Beckerman-Rodau | 10 comments
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Posted in: Guest Contributors, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patent Litigation, Patents, Technology & Innovation, US Supreme Court

The recent Supreme Court decision in the Myriad case, like past decisions, did not announce a clear rule that can be extrapolated from the decision and applied in other technology areas. Consequently, the determination of what subject matter is patent-eligible continues to be unclear.  Patent law specifically identifies four broad categories of subject matter—process, machine, manufacture, or composition of matter—that are patent-eligible.  Although very few things fall outside these categories, the Supreme Court has engrafted some exceptions and limitations onto these statutory categories.  Patentable-eligible subject matter that is otherwise within these categories is deemed ineligible for patent protection if it is a “law of nature,” a “physical phenomenon,” or an “abstract idea.”  The precise meaning or scope of these exceptions and limitations are difficult to enunciate despite the numerous courts that have grappled with this issue. These exceptions and limitations can be viewed as labels that are attached after a judicial balance has been made between competing or conflicting underlying concepts. Justice Thomas recognized that balance in Myriad when he wrote, relying on both Mayo, and Chakrabarty, that “patent protection strikes a delicate balance between creating ‘incentives that lead to creation, invention, and discovery’ and ‘impeding the flow of information that might permit, indeed spur, invention.’”

This balance provides the underlying justification for viewing some discoveries as being so basic or fundamental that everyone should be free to utilize them. Nevertheless, it is imperative that a clear rule or test, based on this justification, is enunciated by the Supreme Court. Any resulting rule will be imperfect because it will potentially be over or under inclusive. Additionally, it will have disproportionate effects on different industries. But the importance of a uniform and predictable rule outweighs these deficiencies because it allows a business enterprise and courts to more easily make decisions. Recent Supreme Court patent decisions have generally rejected bright line tests in favor of a more-opened ended or flexible approach. Unfortunately, this provides limited guidance to lower courts and consequently the issue remains unsettled.