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Posts Tagged ‘ job creation ’

A Strong Innovation Ecosystem is Needed for Job Creation

Posted: Sunday, Nov 9, 2014 @ 10:00 am | Written by Gene Quinn | 4 comments
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Posted in: Gene Quinn, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patents, US Economy

Jay Walker sits with Jon Ellenthal as he listens to his introduction as keynote speaker at the 2014 IP Dealmakers Forum.

On Thursday, November 6, 2014, Jay Waker, the Founder of Priceline.com, gave what can only be described as an inspiration keynote address at the 2014 IP Dealmakers Forum in New York City.

Speaking without notes, Walker was in rare form. This is the presentation that all Congressional Staffers and every Member of Congress needs to hear. Walker spoke about everything from job creation to the need to allow innovators to benefit from the fruits of their labors. The common thread throughout his speech was simple— attracting more customers leads to job creation, the way you attract more customers is to solve problems in innovative ways, and then you patent those solutions, thereby creating a competitive advantage.

“If you are good at solving problems you can have a lot of customers,” Walker explained as he started his address. You can have a billion customers if you solve a problem in the modern world that a lot of people have, her told a packed audience of nearly 200 attendees, with more in the overflow room where his address was being broadcast internally. He then succinctly explained: “How do we solve problems: Inventors.”



Australia Court Says Isolated DNA Patent Eligible, Slams SCOTUS

Posted: Friday, Sep 5, 2014 @ 12:38 pm | Written by Gene Quinn | 30 comments
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Posted in: Australia, Biotechnology, Gene Quinn, International, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patentability, Patents, Technology & Innovation

Yesterday it was reported that the number of Americans submitting a claim for unemployment rose again this week. This morning news broke that the U.S. economy added only 142,000 jobs during the month of August, which was far less than the 225,000 jobs expected to be added during August. According to the Wall Street Journal, “around 60,000 people dropped out of the labor force in August, pulling the labor-force participation rate down to 62.8%.” Job creation at these levels are barely enough to keep up with the population growth, and a far cry from the 300,000+ jobs created that would signal a truly healthy and healing economy.

On the very same day that the U.S. jobs report shows unexpectedly weak growth, the Federal Court of Australia issued a ruling directly opposite to the ruling rendered by the United States Supreme Court relative to gene patents. In Yvonne D’Arcy v. Myriad Genetics, Inc., the Federal Court of Australia ruled that Myriad’s claims to isolated DNA are patentable under the laws of Australia. That is the correct ruling, and it is the ruling the U.S. Supreme Court should have reached in Association of Molecular Pathology v. Myriad Genetics. As the patent eligibility laws of the U.S. become increasingly inhospitable to high-tech innovative businesses we can expect more job losses and worse news for the U.S. economy on the horizon.



Patent Haters Take Notice! University Innovation Fuels Robust Economic Activity

Posted: Wednesday, Aug 7, 2013 @ 7:40 am | Written by Gene Quinn | 5 comments
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Posted in: AUTM, Gene Quinn, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patent Trolls, Patents, Technology & Innovation, Technology Transfer, Universities

On Monday, August 5, 2013, the the Association of University Technology Managers (AUTM), a nonprofit association of academic technology transfer professionals, released the highlights of the AUTM U.S. Licensing Activity Survey: FY2012. The AUTM survey shares quantitative information about licensing activities at U.S. universities, hospitals and research institutions.The full report is scheduled for release at the end of the year.

The highlights of the survey reveal that University licensing and startup activity continued to see a robust increase during fiscal year 2012.

Institutions responding to the survey reported $36.8 billion in net product sales from licensed technologies in fiscal year 2012. In addition, startup companies formed by 70 institutions employed 15,741 full-time employees. This was the second year in which AUTM asked questions specifically targeted at ascertaining the economic impact of academic technology transfer.



The Good Steward – Turning Federal R&D into Economic Growth

Posted: Thursday, Aug 2, 2012 @ 5:47 pm | Written by Senator Birch Bayh | 6 comments
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Posted in: Authors, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Licensing, Patents, US Economy

 

Stewardship: taking good care of the resources entrusted to one

 

Circa 1980: Senator Birch Bayh (right) and Staffer Joseph Allen (left) in a Bayh-Dole hearing.

What should we say about a steward that manages billions of dollars in public research funds not aimed at finding commercial products and turns them in to hundreds of billions of dollars in economic impact while supporting millions of jobs?  You would think that a sincere “thank you” was in order.  But many are saying that the system producing such riches is broken.  Remarkable.

A new study shows that this spinning of straw into gold is precisely what our academic research organizations have been quietly doing year after year.  The just released report “The Economic Contribution of University/Nonprofit Inventions in the United States: 1996-2010” provides a much needed dose of good economic news when we sorely need it.   It shows that the university/industry R&D partnership created by the Bayh-Dole Act of 1980 is essential to our economic growth while protecting public health and well-being.



U.S. Patent and Trademark Office is Hiring Patent Examiners

Posted: Friday, Oct 21, 2011 @ 2:42 pm | Written by Gene Quinn | 4 comments
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Posted in: Gene Quinn, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patents, US Economy, USPTO

Earlier today the United States Patent and Trademark Office tweeted the following: “Follow Einstein’s and Jefferson’s footsteps…become a #Patent Examiner. Apply to the USPTO by Nov. 1.” Yes, the USPTO is hiring more examiners, which is very good news.

The fiscal year 2011 results are now in and the backlog of untouched patent applications as of the end of FY 2011 was 669,625, so there is plenty of work to be done and hiring more patent examiners has to be a part of the solution.  But did you know that Albert Einstein was a patent examiner?  How about Thomas Jefferson?  Jefferson is largely regarded as the first U.S. patent examiner.  Thomas Jefferson (then Secretary of State), along with Secretary of War Henry Knox, and Attorney General Edmund Randolph, made up the first patent examination panel for the United States of America.  Einstein, on the other hand, worked for the Swiss Patent Office.  It was while working for the Patent Office that Einstein came up with his theory of relativity.



Dear Mr. President, Are You Listening?

Posted: Wednesday, Sep 7, 2011 @ 11:03 pm | Written by Henry R. Nothhaft | 2 comments
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Posted in: Authors, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, US Economy

What should you expect from President Obama’s jobs speech tomorrow? Sadly, not much.

The president says that’s the fault of recalcitrant Republicans in Congress. Republicans in Congress say it’s the fault of a president who is hostile to business.

But the real reason we are not putting people back to work three long years into the recession is that Washington is afflicted with a totally-bipartisan cluelessness about how to create jobs.

As I argued in my “Labor Day Message for President Obama” in the Wall Street Journal last weekend, there is a great deal that the president and congress can do to create millions of new jobs quickly, if only they would stop their ideological bickering and instead “focus on a few practical, low-cost measures that we know will create lots of jobs quickly.”



Senate Votes 93-5 to End Debate on Patent Reform, Vote Imminent

Posted: Tuesday, Sep 6, 2011 @ 7:22 pm | Written by Gene Quinn | 19 comments
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Posted in: Congress, Gene Quinn, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patent Reform, Patents, USPTO

The United States Senate voted 93 to 5 earlier this evening to end debate on patent reform, which should set up a vote on H.R. 1249 in the coming days.

The United States Senate first passed its own version of patent reform, dubbed the America Invents Act – S. 23, in February 2011. The House of Representatives took up patent reform in the Spring, ultimately passing H.R. 1249, also dubbed the America Invents Act. Because the House version of patent reform was not identical to the Senate version of patent reform the legislation pinged back to the Senate. Immediately before the Senate went out on its annual August recess Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV) filed for cloture on H.R. 1249, scheduling the Senate’s first day back after the August recess as the day for the cloture vote. That cloture vote is what passed by a vote of 93-5.



Economic Signs Paint Bleak Picture for the Future

Posted: Monday, Jul 11, 2011 @ 4:26 pm | Written by Gene Quinn | 7 comments
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Posted in: Congress, Gene Quinn, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, US Economy

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce conducted two small business focus groups on April 1, 2011, in Philadelphia, as well as a national survey of small business owners through interviews with 900 businesses April 8 – 12, 2011. The findings from this study make up the inaugural quarterly “Small Business Outlook Survey,” and paint an unfortunately bleak picture of the collective outlook of small businesses moving forward.

Small businesses are the backbone of the nation’s economy and those that are most likely to engage in job creation.  Unfortunately, the small businesses surveyed tell a tale of little or no job creation over the next 1 to 3 years, and in fact suggest there will be more layoffs coming.  The respondents see too much uncertainty in Washington, DC, too many regulations and a number of other matters (i.e., the deficit, debt, health care and taxes) as significant impediments to job creation.  This on the heels of a disappointing jobs report for June 2010, downward revisions of the number of jobs created in April and May, and unemployment rising to 9.2%, this Chamber survey only piles on the continuing terrible news for the economy.  With Congress bickering over the obvious — namely that we simply cannot spend money we don’t have and need to start spending less than we bring in to cut the deficit — it doesn’t seem there is likely to be any good news on the horizon.



Great Again: Revitalizing America’s Entrepreneurial Leadership

Posted: Wednesday, Jun 15, 2011 @ 6:05 pm | Written by Gene Quinn | 6 comments
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Posted in: Books & Book Reviews, Gene Quinn, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patents, Technology & Innovation, US Economy

Pat Choate and Hank Nothhaft, at the Met Club, June 14, 2011.

I was lucky enough to receive a review copy of Great Again several months before it became available. I have also had the pleasure of getting to know Hank Nothhaft and his co-author David Kline over the past year or so, frequently exchanging e-mails discussing a variety of innovation and patent related issues. It has been exceptionally difficult to keep quiet knowing what Hank and David were writing about, and then reading the nearly finished manuscript. Simply put, everyone in the innovation industry and patent community needs to read Great Again. Every Staffer on Capitol Hill and everyone working in the White House needs to read Great Again. While Members of Congress are no doubt busy with a great many things, they too should read Great Again, but at the very least Members of Congress and those in the Executive Branch, including President Obama, should at a minimum read the Introduction, which is just 12 pages long.



House Republicans Oppose Adequately Funded Patent Office

Posted: Wednesday, Jun 8, 2011 @ 2:44 pm | Written by Gene Quinn | 32 comments
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Posted in: Congress, Gene Quinn, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patent Reform, Patents, US Economy, USPTO

Congressman Paul Ryan

In a rather stunning development, key Republican leaders in the House of Representatives are opposing an adequately funded Patent Office.  Indeed, the opposition to appropriate funding for the United States Patent and Trademark Office is becoming a political matter, and the language used to describe the issues suggests that Republicans seem to believe they can score points against the Obama Administration by opposing USPTO funding.

In a letter sent to Congressman Lamar Smith (R-TX), two key Republican Chairmen are opposing the USPTO funding mechanisms currently in place in H.R. 1249, which mirror those passed by the Senate earlier this year.  Congressman Paul Ryan (R-WI), who is Chair of the House Committee on the Judiciary, was joined by Congressman Harold Rogers (R-KY), who is Chair of the House Committee on Appropriations, opposing provisions that would allow the Patent and Trademark Office to keep the user fees it collects, which are payment for services to be rendered.