Today's Date: November 24, 2014 Search | Home | Contact | Services | Patent Attorney | Patent Search | Provisional Patent Application | Patent Application | Software Patent | Confidentiality Agreements

Posts Tagged ‘ Judge Richard Linn ’

Judge Richard Linn, First and Foremost a Patent Attorney

Posted: Tuesday, Nov 11, 2014 @ 9:00 am | Written by Gene Quinn | No Comments »
| Tags: , , , , , , , ,
Posted in: Federal Circuit, Gene Quinn, Government, Interviews & Conversations, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patents

Judge Linn (R) with Judge Chen (L) at the AIPLA Meeting on October 24, 2014. Chen was confirmed as Linn’s replacement when Linn took senior status on the Federal Circuit.

On December 9, 2014, the Intellectual Property Owners Education Foundation will host one of the best events of the year. Each year at this banquet and awards ceremony the IPO recognizes the National Inventor of the Year, who this year will be Dr. Hugh Herr, the inventor of bionic prosthetic devices. Today, however, the purpose of this article is talk about the recipient of the 2014 Distinguished IP Professional Award – Judge Richard Linn of the United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit.

Each year for the past several years the IPO has recognized one distinguished IP professional. According to the IPO Award is given to an individual who has demonstrated extraordinary leadership in the IP community and a lifetime commitment to invention and innovation. This year, the recipient of this lifetime achievement award is Judge Linn. I have gotten to know Judge Linn a bit over the past several years, and have admired his decisions for years. In my opinion it is hard to image anyone more qualified or deserving of this recognition than he is.

Judge Linn has seen the industry from a variety of vantage points through his distinguished career, and in so many different ways he is one of us. He started his career at the United States Patent and Trademark Office like so many others have – as a patent examiner. When I spoke with him on Monday, October 27, 2014, regarding the IPO recognizing him with the Distinguished Professional Award, he told me: “first and foremost I consider myself a patent attorney.” This is no doubt what distinguishes him and why so many other patent attorneys have nothing but praise for him.



The Alice in Wonderland En Banc Decision by the Federal Circuit in CLS Bank v. Alice Corp

Posted: Tuesday, May 14, 2013 @ 3:16 pm | Written by John Kong | 22 comments
| Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in: Federal Circuit, Guest Contributors, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patent Litigation, Patents, Software, US Supreme Court, Westerman Hattori Daniels & Adrian

After the Federal Circuit issued its en banc decision on May 10, 2013 in CLS Bank v. Alice Corp, the patent owner Alice Corp must be feeling like Alice in Alice in Wonderland, bewildered and frightened by the fantastical situation in which they find themselves:

(1) “bewildered” because an equally divided Federal Circuit affirmed the district court’s holding that Alice’s claimed system to tangible machine components including a first party device, a data storage unit, a second party device, a computer, and a communications controller, programmed with specialized functions consistent with detailed algorithms disclosed in the patent, constitutes a patent ineligible “abstract idea;”

(2) “frightened” because, as Judge Moore puts it, “this case is the death of hundreds of thousands of patents, including all business method, financial system, and software patents as well as many computer implemented and telecommunications patents” (Moore Op. at 2); and



5 CAFC Judges Say Computers Patentable, Not Software

Posted: Sunday, May 12, 2013 @ 12:54 pm | Written by Gene Quinn | 17 comments
| Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in: Computers, Federal Circuit, Gene Quinn, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Software

UPDATED 5/12/2013 at 3:31pm

In what can only fairly be characterized as utterly ridiculous, 5 of the 10 judges on the Federal Circuit to hear CLS Bank v. Alice Corporation en banc would find that claims that satisfy the machine-or-transformation test are not patentable. While I think it is inappropriate to find the systems claims patent ineligible that isn’t what makes the decision utterly ridiculous. The decision is an embarrassment because 5 other judges would have found the systems claims patent eligible. Thus, we have an even split of opinion at the Federal Circuit.

The Federal Circuit decision in CLS Bank v. Alice Corp. is now being horribly mischaracterized in the media, which will now only further complicate the matter in the court of public opinion. This decision offers no precedent whatsoever regarding systems claims because it was a tie. Alice Corporation loses the systems claims not because that is the law of the land announced by the Federal Circuit, but rather because a single district court judge determined that the systems claims were patent ineligible. Had that same district court judge found the systems claims patent eligible then Alice would have prevailed.

In other words, the Federal Circuit is essentially abdicating its authority relative to whether systems claims are patentable to the district courts and presumably also to the Patent Trial and Appeals Board at the United States Patent and Trademark Office. Whatever the district court or PTAB does is just fine. Well, not quite.



Federal Circuit Nightmare in CLS Bank v. Alice Corp.

Posted: Friday, May 10, 2013 @ 1:26 pm | Written by Gene Quinn | 355 comments
| Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in: Federal Circuit, Gene Quinn, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patents, Software

UPDATED: 2:07pm ET

Well, the United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit sort of decided CLS Bank v. Alice Corporation earlier today. Truthfully, all the important questions that we thought might be answered remain completely and totally unanswered because there were only 10 judges who sat on the en banc tribunal and no more than 5 judges signed on to any one opinion.

The only thing we know is this — the Federal Circuit issued an extraordinarily brief per curiam decision, which stated:

Upon consideration en banc, a majority of the court affirms the district court’s holding that the asserted method and computer-readable media claims are not directed to eligible subject matter under 35 U.S.C. § 101. An equally divided court affirms the district court’s holding that the asserted system claims are not directed to eligible subject matter under that statute.

Thus, all of the asserted claims are not patent eligible. At the moment I am completely flabbergasted and don’t know what to say.



Interview Finale: Judge Richard Linn, CAFC

Posted: Thursday, Mar 14, 2013 @ 11:22 am | Written by Gene Quinn | 2 comments
| Tags: , , , , , , ,
Posted in: Federal Circuit, Gene Quinn, Interviews & Conversations, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patents

Judge Richard Linn, in chambers at the CAFC Feb. 8, 2012.

This final installment of my interview with Judge Linn of the United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit. In part I of the interview we discussed a number of general background issues, including how the Judge got into the field of patent law and became a Judge on the Federal Circuit. In part II of the interview we discussed the Inns of Court and the Richard Linn Inn Alliance, as well as civility (or lack thereof) in litigation.

In this final segment of the interview, which appears below, we move into the issues of the day: the changing patent laws and Supreme Court interest in patents. We also discuss Judge Linn’s decision to take senior status, the fact that he won’t be able to sit en banc unless he was on the original panel, and the Judge’s idea that only few cases really should be designated as precedential opinions.



Interview Exclusive: Judge Richard Linn Part II

Posted: Tuesday, Mar 12, 2013 @ 10:25 am | Written by Gene Quinn | Comments Off
| Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in: Federal Circuit, Gene Quinn, Interviews & Conversations, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patent Litigation, Patents

Judge Richard Linn of the Federal Circuit, in chambers on Feb. 8, 2013.

On Friday, February 8, 2013, I had the honor to interview Judge Richard Linn of the Federal Circuit. We met in his chambers with the recording going for approximately 60 minutes. In Part I of the interview we discussed Judge Linn’s early interest in patent law and how he found himself appointed to replace the recently deceased Judge Giles Sutherland Rich. We then discussed engaging as a lawyer with civility while still zealously representing clients. That brought us to a topic near and dear to the Judge’s heart — the Inns of Court and the many patent focused Inns across the country that together make up the Richard Linn Inn Alliance.

In Part II of the interview, which appears below, we pick up with the discussion of the Inns of Court and further discuss civility and “Rambo style lawyering,” which Judge Linn explains was really the genesis behind the forming of the Inns of Court.

QUINN: I’m a member of the Pauline Newman Inn that meets at the Patent Office, and we’re members of the Linn Inn Alliance.  I mean, first off how does that feel?   How did it come about, I guess, maybe, first off.  Second is how does that feel that the entire industries, the lawyers, are lining up in droves to join the Linn Inn Alliance?  I would think that that is great evidence of what the industry does think of you and that this is really promulgated out of one Inn.

LINN: Well, I’ve been actively involved in the Inns of Court since I came onto the Court.   The American Inns of Court is a unique organization.  It plays a unique and important role in promoting ethics, civility and professionalism, and that’s what appeals to me.  In 2000, I started attending meetings of the Giles Rich Inn, which meets here at the Federal Circuit every month.  I’m lucky enough to fill the seat once occupied by Judge Rich.  We’re sitting here in my chambers, which once were Judge Rich’s chambers.  And when I first came on to the Court I felt a special responsibility to conduct myself in a way that would have made him proud, because he was always an icon in my eyes.



Exclusive Interview: Judge Richard Judge Linn of the CAFC

Posted: Sunday, Mar 10, 2013 @ 4:00 pm | Written by Gene Quinn | 2 comments
| Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in: Federal Circuit, Gene Quinn, Interviews & Conversations, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patents

Judge Richard Linn, U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, Feb. 8, 2013.

On Friday, February 8, 2013, I had the honor to interview Judge Richard Linn of the United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit. Those in the industry know that Judge Linn is one of a small group of Judges who are patent attorneys. He is one of us in so many ways. He is a very real and genuine person, he is a great believer in the patent system, and he has long been a friend to patent groups and a mentor to many. Judge Linn started his a career as so many patent professionals have — as the newest patent examiner at the United States Patent and Trademark Office. We learn in the interview that his interest in patent law started well earlier, thanks to his Uncle who was a patent illustrator.

After leaving the Patent Office Judge Linn rose through the ranks to become a prominent patent attorney in Washington, DC. Ultimately, he was in the right place at the right time, and he was fortunate enough to be recognized by the right people. He was appointed to the Federal Circuit to replace the legendary Giles Sutherland Rich. Big shoes to fill no doubt, but in terms of influence on the Court and impact on the profession few can compare to Judge Linn. He has, and continues, to carve out his own legacy as one of the preeminent patent leaders in the United States.

We spent approximately 60 minutes on the record with my iPhone recorder on, meeting in his chambers at the Federal Circuit, which overlooks Lafayette Park. Judge Linn recently took senior status, and lives full-time in Florida. He returns approximately every other month, sometimes more frequent, to hear cases. He will soon be giving up this office once the President’s appointments to the Court are confirmed. Judge Linn assures me he will remain active with the Federal Circuit.

When I sit down to interview someone I sometimes have a sense where things may lead, but inevitably interesting topics arise, sometimes based off a seemingly innocuous question. In Part I, which is below, I asked a familiar question: Do you find that the harder you worked the luckier you got? Judge Linn used this to discuss the importance of practicing law with integrity while managing to be a zealous advocate and without sacrificing civility. This theme carriers over into Part II of the interview and should, in my opinion, be mandatory reading for law students and associates. In fact, it is a good reminder for more senior attorneys who sometimes might lose sight of the forest for the trees.



Hall v. Bed Bath & Beyond: Design Infringement Can Proceed

Posted: Friday, Feb 8, 2013 @ 8:30 am | Written by Jason Williams | Comments Off
| Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in: Federal Circuit, Guest Contributors, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patent Litigation, Patents, Technology & Innovation

On January 25 2013, the United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit (CAFC) issued its opinion in the case of Hall v. Bed Bath & Beyond, which was authored by Judge Newman who was joined by Judge Linn; Judge Lourie filed an opinion dissenting in part. The appeal arose from the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York. The CAFC ultimately reversed the district court’s dismissal of the plaintiff’s complaint counts for patent infringement, Lanham Act unfair competition, and New York unfair competition and misappropriation.

The patent in question — U.S. Design Patent No. D596,439  (the ’439 patent) — covers a Tote Towel which is essentially a large towel that has padding around the edges, and “zippered pockets at both ends, and an angled cloth loop in the middle.” Mr. Roger Hall (“Mr. Hall”) filed the patent application on November 17, 2008.

Mr. Hall contacted Bed Bath & Beyond (BB&B) in hopes of having them resell his Tote Towel in its stores nationwide. At the time of the meeting with BB&B, the patent application was pending and packaging on Mr. Hall’s Tote Towel reflected so. Instead of entering into a contractual relationship to resell the Tote Towel, BB&B which still had a prototype of Mr. Hall’s Tote Towel, decided to mass produce its own version manufactured in Pakistan.



AIPLA Honors Judge Newman with Excellence Award

Posted: Monday, Oct 29, 2012 @ 7:30 am | Written by Gene Quinn | 2 comments
| Tags: , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in: AIPLA, Federal Circuit, Gene Quinn, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patents

Todd Dickinson (right) escorts Judge Newman off stage after receiving the AIPLA Excellence Award.

On Friday, October 26, 2012, at the Gala dinner event at the Annual Meeting of the American Intellectual Property Law Association (AIPLA), Judge Pauline Newman of the United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit received the 2012 AIPLA Excellence Award.

The Program for the event explained that the Excellence Award was presented to Judge Newman “in recognition of extraordinary leadership and service to the Intellectual Property Community, which is representative of a distinguished career marked by intellect, integrity, and an unwavering commitment to the administration of justice.”

The AIPLA has honored a number of excellent and worthy winners in the past including Chief Judge Howard T. Markey, Chief Judge Paul Michel, Judge Rich and Donald Dunner to name but a few.  Judge Pauline Newman is now a recipient of this top industry recognition, and if you ask me she is deserving of being on the Mount Rushmore of this exclusive club.



Remembering Nuijten and Comisky 5 Years Later

Posted: Wednesday, Sep 19, 2012 @ 7:25 am | Written by Gene Quinn | 14 comments
| Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in: Federal Circuit, Gene Quinn, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patentability, Patents

Five years ago, on Thursday, September 20, 2007, the United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit issued two decisions that provoked much debate, and which deserve to be remembered.  One the Court got right  and, sadly, one the Court got excruciatingly wrong.

The first case, In re Comiskey, seemed rather straight forward and certainly not earth shattering, except perhaps for one issue – namely that the Federal Circuit issued its decision on patentable subject matter grounds without patentable subject matter ever being an issue during prosecution or on appeal.

In Comiskey, one set of claims were directed to the purely mental process of arbitrating a matter and deciding the outcome. The Federal Circuit did not waste time pointing out that arbitration is extremely well known and could hardly be considered patentably new or nonobvious, rather they cut to the chase and explained that the law does not allow patents to be issued on particular business systems that depend entirely on the use of mental processes, deciding that “the application of human intelligence to the solution of practical problems is not in and of itself patentable.”