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Posts Tagged ‘ Patent Reform ’

The America Invents Act – Panacea or Just Pain for the PTO?

Posted: Sunday, Nov 27, 2011 @ 8:00 am | Written by Charles Gorenstein | 8 comments
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Posted in: America Invents Act, Guest Contributors, International, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patent Reform, Patents, USPTO

Anyone interested in reading this is likely old enough to have heard the old saying “Be careful what you wish for – you may get it.” Now we have it. Many people situated variously within and outside of the patent system of the United States urged the adoption of first-to-file. The underlying reasons included harmonization with the laws of other nations, and simplification or elimination of some proceedings in our own system, etc. with a view toward curing some of what has been ailing the U.S. patent system. The day, March 16, 2013, is now approaching when first-to-file will be a reality.

There are many questions about the scope and possible impact of the AIA. Exactly how it will all play out remains to be seen. A significant question is what will be the likely impact of the AIA upon the operations of the USPTO, an organization that has been so greatly over-burdened in recent times.



Two Free Webinars on America Invents Act This Week

Posted: Sunday, Oct 30, 2011 @ 2:30 pm | Written by Gene Quinn | Comments Off
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Posted in: America Invents Act, Gene Quinn, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patent Reform, Patents

There are two free webinars this week relative to the America Invents Act to alert you to. Given the enormity of the changes and how every time I read the legislation I seem to find something new, you might want to take time to sign up for both. The first will be hosted by the United States Patent and Trademark Office on Monday, October 31, 2011 beginning at 1:00 pm ET. The second, which will focus specifically on how the AIA will impact your business, is provided by K&L Gates and will be on Thursday, November 3, 2011 from 3:00pm to 4:30 pm ET.



Point – Counterpoint: The Debate Over Prior User Rights

Posted: Thursday, Oct 27, 2011 @ 2:48 pm | Written by Gene Quinn | 53 comments
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Posted in: America Invents Act, Gene Quinn, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patent Litigation, Patent Reform, Patents

Since prior user rights first came up as an issue in the patent reform debate I have been opposed to the idea.  Whether I like prior user rights or not, the reality is that prior user rights are now a part of U.S. patent law.  Nevertheless, the debate goes on about whether prior user rights are a good idea.  In fact, the United States Patent and Trademark Office is tasked through the America Invents Act with conducting a Prior User Rights Study.  To facilitate this study a public hearing on prior user rights was held on October 25 in the Madison Auditorium at its Alexandria, Virginia campus of the USPTO.

With this in mind I thought I would once again revisit prior user rights. One of the arguments I have heard recently supporting prior user rights is that a corporation that is going to invest billions of dollars into a facility should know that their investment is safe and that the plant can’t be shut down by a later filed patent application.  This argument is so specious as to be nearly laughable if you ask me.  This strikes me as just more of corporate America wanting the government to save them from themselves.



Patent Reform and Patent Bar Review, What You Should Know

Posted: Tuesday, Oct 25, 2011 @ 7:30 am | Written by Gene Quinn & John White | 2 comments
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Posted in: America Invents Act, Gene Quinn, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, John White, Patent Bar Exam, Patent Bar Review, Patent Reform, Patents, Practising Law Institute

No doubt you have heard about the new law that is upon us in the land of patents; it’s in all the papers and on all the blogs.  The America Invents Act was signed by President Obama on September 16, 2011, and marks the largest single re-write of U.S. patent law ever.  Even the 1952 Patent Act pales in comparison because that was almost completely a codification of existing case law that had developed over the decades.  America Invents, however, embarks upon a new path and leads us into the great unknown in many respects.

Those preparing to take the patent bar exam or contemplating sitting for the exam at some point in time in the future likely don’t want to hear that U.S. patent law is heading into the great unknown.  How can you be expected to take a pass the patent bar examination under these circumstances?  First: Relax. You do not have to unlearn or forget what you are currently learning, or soon will learn, for the patent exam or for your practice life after you pass the exam.  That being said, the sooner you do take the patent bar exam the better off you will be!



America Invents: The Unintended Consequences of Patent Reform

Posted: Monday, Oct 24, 2011 @ 2:31 pm | Written by Gene Quinn | 18 comments
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Posted in: Congress, Gene Quinn, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patent Reform, Patents

It is virtually impossible to in any intellectually honest way truthfully determine what the legislative intent of Congress was for any particular piece of legislation.  Justice Antonin Scalia has railed against the use of legislative history for decades, saying “legislative history is irrelevant when the statutory text is clear,” and referring to the “legal fiction” that legislative history, including Committee Reports, actually reflect the intent of the Congress.  This is, of course, because it is exceptionally easy to get something into the legislative history, so anything that appears in the legislative history may only be the view of one particular Member of Congress, or worse the view of a lobbyist paying for access.  There is also the problem associated with Members of Congress saying things they simply don’t understand, and the reality that the legislative history cannot be cross examined.  Even Committee Reports are at best the view of a majority of a group that makes up a small fraction of the overall Congress.  It seems a fools errand to rely on legislative history in all but the rarest case, and Scalia’s view seems to be the prevailing view of this Supreme Court.

Notwithstanding the inherent unreliability of legislative history and the truly scary prospect of trying to get inside the head of Members of Congress, it seems fairly clear to me that the America Invents Act, which was signed into law by President Obama on September 16, 2011, contains at least a handful of things that can only be characterized as unintended consequences.  Among them are: (1) U.S. patents issued from foreign filings will be prior art as of the foreign filing date; (2) commonly owned patent applications cannot be used against each other for novelty purposes; and (3) the creation of an post grant challenge limbo because of the delay in initiating post-grant review procedures.



USPTO to Conduct Studies of Prior User Rights and International Patent Protection for Small Businesses per America Invents Act

Posted: Tuesday, Oct 18, 2011 @ 3:01 pm | Written by U.S.P.T.O. | Comments Off
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Posted in: America Invents Act, Congress, International, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patent Reform, Patents, USPTO

The United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) released two Federal Register Notices on October 7, 2011, seeking written comments and announcing two public hearings for two studies the agency is required to conduct under the America Invents Act. Specifically, Congress is requiring the USPTO to study and report on the availability of prior user rights in foreign countries as well as options to aid small businesses and independent inventors in securing patent protection for their inventions. The USPTO reports for both studies are due in mid-January 2012.

“The objective of the written comments and hearings is to collect information from the public on the scope of the two studies,” said Under Secretary of Commerce for Intellectual Property and Director of the USPTO David Kappos. “Public participation in both the Prior User Rights Study and the International Patent Protection Study is necessary to assist the agency in preparing for Congress the most informed and accurate report possible.”



America Invents: A Simple Guide to Patent Reform, Part 2

Posted: Thursday, Oct 13, 2011 @ 5:32 pm | Written by Gene Quinn | 5 comments
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Posted in: America Invents Act, Congress, Gene Quinn, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patent Reform, Patents

I have done quite a bit of writing about the America Invents Act, but I have been a bit derelict in providing the sequel to America Invents: A Simple Guide to Patent Reform, Part 1.  Part of the reason, if not the entirety of the reason, is that the major parts of the American Invents Act that remain are anything but simple.

I was speaking with John White via telephone yesterday about the America Invents Act.  Yes, John and I are thoroughly immersed in this legislation and coming up with wrinkle after wrinkle that you probably never thought about.  Fun I know, but that is what two wild, crazy and tremendously charismatic patent attorneys talk about!  In any event, I told him I was having difficulty and asked him — how do you describe prior user rights, post-grant review and supplemental examination simply?  His response: “You don’t.”  We went on to talk about how first to file isn’t all that simple either, although the name suggests otherwise.  This thing, the monstrosity that is the America Invents Act, will be a full employment act for lawyers!  But when is it ever good for clients when it is good for the attorneys?

In any event, on this note I embark upon Part 2, which will seek to make sense of prior user rights, post-grant review, preissuance submission and patentability changes. This will leave inter partes review, supplemental examination and derivation proceedings for the finale — Part 3.  I will endeavor to describe these in the most straight forward way possible, but I am going to completely punt on Section 18 as it pertains to business methods and post-grant review, at least for now.  I just see no way to explain that in a “simple” way.  Notwithstanding, look for an article on Section 18 soon (a relative term I know), along with an article about specific peculiarities and likely unintended consequences of the Act.



Some More Heretical Thoughts on Strategies for Coping with First to File Under the America Invents Act*

Posted: Wednesday, Oct 5, 2011 @ 12:20 pm | Written by Eric Guttag | 23 comments
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Posted in: America Invents Act, Eric Guttag, Guest Contributors, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patent Reform, Patents

Now that the “ink is dry” on the American Invents Act (which I refer to as the “Abominable Inane Act” or AIA), it’s now time to consider how to cope with (and even take advantage of) the AIA. See my prior article — American Davids of Innovation, Start Your Engines: Strategies for Coping with First to File Under the America Invents Act. Take advantage of the AIA? Oh, yes. I’m referring to the new “grace period” provision in Section 3(b)(1) (Exceptions for Disclosures Made 1 Year Or Less Before The Effective Filing Date Of The Claimed Invention) which will eventually become new 35 U.S.C. 102(b)(1) which may allow the inventor/patent applicant to have his/her cake and eat it too, come March 16, 2013 when this provision of the AIA goes into effect.