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Posts Tagged ‘ patents ’

Congressional Testimony: Lee on USPTO Patent Operations

Posted: Wednesday, Jul 30, 2014 @ 12:37 pm | Written by Gene Quinn | 4 comments
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Posted in: Congress, Gene Quinn, Government, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patents, USPTO

Michelle Lee, PTO Deputy Director

Later today, at 3pm Eastern, Michelle Lee, the Deputy Director of the United States Patent and Trademark Office, will testify at a hearing on Capitol Hill before the U.S. House of Representatives Subcommittee on Courts, Intellectual Property and the Internet. This panel, which is a subset of the House Judiciary Committee, is holding a hearing titled: U.S. Patent and Trademark Office: The America Invents Act and Beyond, Domestic and International Policy Goals.

In her prepared remarks, Lee substantively will begin by saying she is pleased that Congress approved “a FY 2015 appropriation bill that provides USPTO with the authority to spend anticipated fee collections as estimated by the Congressional Budget Office.” Sadly, this is something to be thankful for as odd as it seems. While significant user fees are generated by the USPTO, without the approval of Congress the USPTO cannot keep and spend the funds collected. Lee explained that by being granted permission to keep and use collected user fees the Office will “continue reducing the patent application backlog, shortening patent pendency, improving patent quality, enhancing patent administrative appeal and post-grant processes, fine tuning trademark operations, expanding our international efforts and investing in our information technology (IT) infrastructure.”



Canon Invents: Digital Cameras, Video Editing, Medical Imaging

Posted: Wednesday, Jul 30, 2014 @ 8:00 am | Written by Steve Brachmann | No Comments »
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Posted in: Canon, Companies We Follow, Consumer Products, Electronics, Guest Contributors, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patents, Printers, Steve Brachmann, Technology & Innovation

Canon corprate offices in Jamesburg, New Jersey.

A worldwide leader in the development of camcorders, cameras, photocopiers and other imaging and printing devices, Canon Inc. of Tokyo, Japan, is one of the most active developers of new intellectual properties in the world. Although this article published by Tom’s Guide erroneously reports it as patented, Canon has developed and filed a patent application recently for camera imaging technologies which can better recreate human skin tones in captured images. Canon also owns a great share of the worldwide document imaging market, and it has created a stir with a recently released office document scanner with applications in the real estate, financial, legal, healthcare, insurance and other industries. Canon has recently been making waves in the patent world, teaming up in an alliance with Google, called the License on Transfer Network, which aims to protect alliance members against what they consider to be baseless patent lawsuits. The corporation has also successfully completed a patent infringement suit of its own which prevents Nectron International from making, importing and selling certain toner cartridges and other components of Canon and Hewlett-Packard laser beam printers.

Canon’s immense amount of activity in the world of U.S. patents makes them a great business to feature in our Companies We Follow series here on IPWatchdog. As always, we scan the recent publications of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, including both patent applications and issued patents, to share our favorite collection of inventions from each corporation we profile. In our new format, we’re able to delve deeply into Canon’s most recent innovations, which represent a great deal of research and development in medical imaging, business administration, photography and videography.



Populist Disconnect and the Whittling Away of IP Rights

Posted: Tuesday, Jul 29, 2014 @ 5:35 pm | Written by Gene Quinn | 14 comments
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Posted in: Copyright, Gene Quinn, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patents, US Economy

In Joe Allen’s recent column Does Innovation Lead to Prosperity for All? he ended with a quote by Alexander Fraser Tyler from The Decline and Fall of the Athenian Republic, which suggested that a democracy cannot continue to exist once the majority realizes they can vote for candidates that promise a never ending stream of benefits. Eventually, the result of politicians handing out money and benefits for votes leads to a collapse as the result of unsustainable fiscal policy.  Allen quizzically ends by stating that this couldn’t ever happen in the United States, could it? Sadly, we know it is happening in America.

As of the writing of this article the U.S. national debt is over $17.6 trillion, which if you write out in long form is $17,600,000,000,000.00. To put this into perspective, if you wanted to count to 1 trillion and you counted a number ever second non-stop without sleep it would take you 31,546 years, which means that to count to 17.6 trillion would take you over 555,209 years. Explained another way, the height of a stack of 1 trillion one dollar bills measures 67,866 miles, which means that 17.6 trillion one dollar bills would be nearly 1.2 million miles. To put this into perspective the Earth is only on average 238,855 miles away from the moon.

Saying the United States has a spending problem is an extraordinary understatement, but spending continues. The public demands spending and so many people now erroneously believe that the way to improve the economy is for the government to spend ever more sums while at the same time regulating business like never before. Taking the foot off the throat of the private sector and reducing government spending has been a time tested and effective way to stimulate activity, create jobs and improve the overall economic condition of the U.S. economy. So there is an extreme disconnect between historical reality, what the people want and the policies America is pursuing.



Does Innovation Lead to Prosperity for All?

Posted: Monday, Jul 28, 2014 @ 12:30 pm | Written by Joseph Allen | 23 comments
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Posted in: Guest Contributors, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Joe Allen, Patents, Technology & Innovation, US Economy

There’s a famous Chinese curse “May you live in interesting times” which certainly applies now. It seems that every cornerstone we’ve relied on has slipped, creating instability in all aspects of modern life. As humorist Ogden Nash remarked: “Progress might have been all right once, but it has gone on too long.”

We live in a world where seemingly everyone has a cell phone —and a rifle. Every day we learn of breathtaking scientific discoveries and atrocities straight from the Dark Ages. Thanks to technology images of beheadings travel instantly around the world.

Debates rage over hot button topics widening divisions in society. One is over the merits (or demerits) of the patent system. That’s really a subset of a larger question: does innovation lead to prosperity for most people or does it merely widen the gap between the haves and have not’s?

What, if anything, should be done to correct “income inequality” is a point of contention in our political system. President Obama says that growing income inequality and a lack of upward mobility is “the defining challenge of our time.” Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) ads: “Trickle down (economics) doesn’t work. Never did.”



How Long Does a Patent Last?

Posted: Saturday, Jul 26, 2014 @ 9:00 am | Written by Gene Quinn | 4 comments
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Posted in: Educational Information for Inventors, Gene Quinn, Inventors Information, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patents

Before June of 1995, the patent laws in the United States provided that the term of a utility or plant patent ended seventeen years from the date of patent grant. To comply with Article 33 of the Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) Agreement resulting from the Uruguay Round Agreements of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT), the United States was required to establish a minimum term for patent protection ending no earlier than twenty years from the date the application was filed. Thus, the Uruguay Round Agreements Act amended 35 U.S.C. § 154, and these amendments took effect on June 8, 1995.

Generally speaking, utility and plant patent applications filed on or after June 8, 1995, have a term that begins on the date the patent issues and ends on the date that is twenty years from the date on which the application for the patent was filed in the United States. If the application that ultimately issues contains a specific reference to an earlier filed US or international application, the term ends twenty years from the filing date of the earliest such application. This patent term provision is referred to as the “twenty-year term.”



Alice v. CLS Reality: PTO Pulling Back Notices of Allowance

Posted: Friday, Jul 25, 2014 @ 4:44 pm | Written by Gene Quinn | 42 comments
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Posted in: Gene Quinn, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patent Prosecution, Patentability, Patents, Software, Technology & Innovation, USPTO

UPDATED: Saturday, July 26, 2014 at 11:20am

Over the last several days I have heard of an alarming trend from the United States Patent and Trademark Office — Patent Examiners are canceling Notices of Allowance and yanking previously granted claims back into prosecution while citing the United States Supreme Court’s ruling in Alice v. CLS Bank. In some instances granted claims are being pulled back into prosecution only to be rejected as lacking patent eligible subject matter even after the issue fee has been paid. I have also been told that an Examiner in one case has issued a new Examiner’s Answer to include a new Alice 101 rejection.

This is an alarming trend that seems to be building steam as virtually everyone who operates in this space is now seeing the aforementioned and/or they are seeing supplemental office actions issued where the pending office action never rejected claims based on patent eligibility grounds.

Rejecting claims after the issue fee has been paid represents an extraordinary disconnect from the initial USPTO guidance that essentially said that Alice changed nothing from a substantive point of view. I was shocked that the USPTO issued such guidance because if you actually read the Supreme Court’s decision in Alice you could hardly walk away with the belief that nothing had changed.

In the immediate aftermath of the Supreme Court’s decision in Alice the USPTO told examiners that the reason Alice’s claims were determined to be patent ineligible was because “the generically-recited computers in the claims add nothing of substance to the underlying abstract idea.” The USPTO, by and through the Deputy Commissioner for Patent Examination Policy, Andrew Hirshfeld, then went on to point out to patent examiners that there is no new category of innovation that is patent ineligible, nor is there any new or special requirements for the eligibility of either software or business methods. Hirshfeld explained: “Notably, Alice Corp. neither creates a per se excluded category of subject matter, such as software or business methods, nor imposes any special requirements for eligibility of software or business methods.”



Ignorance Is Not Bliss: Alice Corp. v. CLS Bank International*

Posted: Friday, Jul 25, 2014 @ 1:48 pm | Written by Eric Guttag | 17 comments
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Posted in: Eric Guttag, Guest Contributors, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patentability, Patents, Software, Technology & Innovation

Justice Thomas

I feel like a very broken record. In an IPWatchdog article I wrote back in 2012, I commented on the currently fractured patent-eligibility landscape in the split Federal Circuit panel decision in CLS Bank International v. Alice Corp. Pty. Ltd. where a claimed trading platform for exchanging business obligations survived a validity challenge under 35 U.S.C. § 101. See The Fractured Landscape of Patent Eligibility for Business Methods and Systems in CLS Bank International. That fracture got even worse in the subsequent en banc ruling which can only be described as lengthy, tumultuous, and confusing, with a brief per curiam opinion, as well as six full opinions.

With the Supreme Court’s most recent foray into the patent-eligibility world in Alice Corp. v. CLS Bank International, we now have a complete and utter disaster as to what data processing claims can (or more unfortunately cannot) survive scrutiny by Our Judicial Mount Olympus under 35 U.S.C. § 101. I once had respect for Justice Thomas’ view on patent law jurisprudence, having considered his substandard opinion in Myriad on the patent-eligibility of certain “isolated” DNA claims to be an “isolated” aberration. But having now read his mind-boggling Opinion for the Court in Alice Corp., I’ve now thrown my previously “cheery” view of Thomas’ understanding of patent law jurisprudence completely into the toilet. I have even less kind words to say about the three Justices that signed onto Justice Sotomayor’s disingenuous concurring opinion that accepts retired Justice Steven’s equally disingenuous suggestion in Bilski that 35 U.S.C. § 273 (in which Congress acknowledged implicitly, if not explicitly the patent-eligibility of “business methods” under 35 U.S.C. § 101) is a mere “red herring.” See Section 273 is NOT a Red Herring: Steven’s Disingenuous Concurrence in Bilski.

The Supreme Court’s decision in Alice Corp. operates from the view that “ignorance is bliss” when it come to the patent statutes, as well science and technology. I don’t share that view and never will. So in the format that I began with in shredding Justice Alito’s “comedic” opinion in Limelight Networks, here are my “ignorance is not bliss” candidates for Alice Corp., in all their ugliness.



A Patent History of Filmmaking

Posted: Thursday, Jul 24, 2014 @ 8:00 am | Written by Gene Quinn & Steve Brachmann | No Comments »
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Posted in: Evolution of Technology, Gene Quinn, Guest Contributors, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patents, Steve Brachmann, Technology & Innovation

NOTE: A version of this article was originally published by the ABA in May/June 2014 issue of LANDSLIDE, a publication of the ABA Section of Intellectual Property Law. 

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The history of film is a long one that, by some accounts, extends as far back as the early 1700s and the discovery by German physicist Johann Heinrich Schulze that silver salts react to light exposure by becoming darker in color.[i] By the late 1800s, celluloid film had appeared and the ability to record motion pictures through a camera had become a reality. Indeed, it was none other than George Eastman, who in 1889 perfected the first commercial transparent roll film, one year after the name “Kodak” first began to be used to market his cameras.[ii] It was the Eastman flexible film advancement that made it possible for the development of Thomas Edison’s motion picture camera in 1891. Edison called his first generation picture camera a “Kinetoscope,” after the Greek words “kineto,” which means “movement,” and “scopos,” which means “to watch.”[iii] Edison filed a patent application on the Kinetoscope on August 24, 1891, and the patent ultimately issued on August 31, 1897.[iv]

Over the years, the industry has seen some incredible innovations that include improvements to color exposures, sound recording and the current-day transition to digital recording. The glittering lights of Hollywood and other filmmaking scenes throughout the world have risen on the backs of these developments. Many of these film innovations have been subject to patent protection, with countless patent applications being filed with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, which has granted many protections to film innovators over the years. A quick survey of patents granted since the earliest days of film shows that over the course of less than a century film and motion pictures have gone through some immense changes. A review of patented film technologies took us on a journey from feeding celluloid film through a recording device to writing video data digitally to an optical disk for easier computer editing. What follows are some of the patented inventions that most captured my attention and imagination.