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Posts Tagged ‘ tax policy ’

America Needs a National Manufacturing Policy

Posted: Friday, Jan 18, 2013 @ 10:56 am | Written by Gene Quinn | Comments Off
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Posted in: China, Gene Quinn, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Technology & Innovation, US Economy

In December 2012, the Information Technology and Innovation Foundation (ITIF) issued a report titled Why America Needs A National Network for Manufacturing Innovation. The report asserts, among many other things, that “[t]he federal government must play a catalytic role in bringing NNMI into existence.”

My own view of government precludes me from sharing the ultimate goal of a government should initiate a National Network for Manufacturing Innovation (NNMI). I tend toward the Jeffersonian view of government — that government which governs least governs best. I am also a big believer in the power of incentives. In all walks of life what is obtained is what is incentivized. If employees know how they will be evaluated, for example, even a mediocre employee can achieve high marks by performing tot the evaluation. Tax policy is another excellent example, as is the patent system.

For better or for worse, the United States has not incentivized manufacturing. In fact, the incentives associated with manufacturing are to off-shore manufacturing rather than do it in the United States. There are too many bureaucratic hurdles to opening a business in the U.S., particularly a manufacturing facility. Anyone who doubts this needs to read Great Again: Revitalizing America’s Entrepreneurial Leadership.



Obamacare and the Supremes, A Patent Attorney’s Perspective

Posted: Thursday, Jun 28, 2012 @ 6:25 pm | Written by Gene Quinn | 18 comments
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Posted in: Gene Quinn, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles

Chief Justice John Roberts

Today’s Supreme Court ruling on Obamacare is historic.  This issue has dominated political and private discourse for the past several years in America and, therefore, it is unrealistic to believe any legal commentator could resist the temptation to comment or opine.  While Obamacare and the Supreme Court decision have nothing to do with intellectual property, I will, to the best of my abilities, turn this into a tongue in cheek patent commentary.  Of course that is after I bash the Supreme Court.  So liberals and others who believe the Supreme Court knows anything about anything should probably skip Part 1 and jump right to Part 2 of the article.  I had a blast writing it.  Hopefully you will have as much fun reading.

Part 1: Not Intended for Liberal / Supreme Court Consumption

A majority of the Supreme Court finally placed a meaningful limitation on the rampant, intellectually dishonest and terribly troubling use of the Commerce Clause to justify everything Congress ever wants to do.  Unfortunately (at least in my opinion), Chief Justice John Roberts got in touch with his inner liberal and decided that the individual mandate is constitutional under the taxing power granted to Congress in the Constitution.  Rather peculiar given that during the rancorous debates and ultimate passage of the bill the Obama Administration and Democrats in Congress repeatedly proclaimed this was not a tax on the American people.  To be fair, the Obama Administration did seem to argue it both ways on the tax issue depending upon the forum.  I guess arguing in the alternative paid off even if Congress and the President were dishonest with the American people in public.



A Manufacturing Strategy for 2012: Keeping Jobs & IP in the U.S.

Posted: Monday, Dec 26, 2011 @ 1:32 pm | Written by Gene Quinn | 2 comments
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Posted in: Business, China, Department of Commerce, Gene Quinn, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, US Economy

Several weeks ago, on December 11, 2011, U.S. Commerce Secretary John Bryson set out his vision for how the Department of Commerce can best partner with the business community to support President Obama’s jobs agenda.  If the past is any indication of the future, President Obama and it senior team will do whatever they can leading into the new year to jump start the economy and get Americans back to work.

At his speech at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, Commerce Secretary Bryson outlined his top three priorities to help American businesses “build it here and sell it everywhere,” focusing on supporting advanced manufacturing, increasing our exports, and attracting more investment to America from all over the world.  The key to emerging from the Great Recession is, of course, manufacturing.  Manufacturing jobs have left the U.S. in favor of more business friendly climates in other countries, taking with them U.S. jobs and U.S. intellectual property.  But moving into a Presidential election year will government be able to do anything that is at all likely to help?



Economic Signs Paint Bleak Picture for the Future

Posted: Monday, Jul 11, 2011 @ 4:26 pm | Written by Gene Quinn | 7 comments
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Posted in: Congress, Gene Quinn, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, US Economy

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce conducted two small business focus groups on April 1, 2011, in Philadelphia, as well as a national survey of small business owners through interviews with 900 businesses April 8 – 12, 2011. The findings from this study make up the inaugural quarterly “Small Business Outlook Survey,” and paint an unfortunately bleak picture of the collective outlook of small businesses moving forward.

Small businesses are the backbone of the nation’s economy and those that are most likely to engage in job creation.  Unfortunately, the small businesses surveyed tell a tale of little or no job creation over the next 1 to 3 years, and in fact suggest there will be more layoffs coming.  The respondents see too much uncertainty in Washington, DC, too many regulations and a number of other matters (i.e., the deficit, debt, health care and taxes) as significant impediments to job creation.  This on the heels of a disappointing jobs report for June 2010, downward revisions of the number of jobs created in April and May, and unemployment rising to 9.2%, this Chamber survey only piles on the continuing terrible news for the economy.  With Congress bickering over the obvious — namely that we simply cannot spend money we don’t have and need to start spending less than we bring in to cut the deficit — it doesn’t seem there is likely to be any good news on the horizon.



Great Again: Revitalizing America’s Entrepreneurial Leadership

Posted: Wednesday, Jun 15, 2011 @ 6:05 pm | Written by Gene Quinn | 6 comments
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Posted in: Books & Book Reviews, Gene Quinn, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patents, Technology & Innovation, US Economy

Pat Choate and Hank Nothhaft, at the Met Club, June 14, 2011.

I was lucky enough to receive a review copy of Great Again several months before it became available. I have also had the pleasure of getting to know Hank Nothhaft and his co-author David Kline over the past year or so, frequently exchanging e-mails discussing a variety of innovation and patent related issues. It has been exceptionally difficult to keep quiet knowing what Hank and David were writing about, and then reading the nearly finished manuscript. Simply put, everyone in the innovation industry and patent community needs to read Great Again. Every Staffer on Capitol Hill and everyone working in the White House needs to read Great Again. While Members of Congress are no doubt busy with a great many things, they too should read Great Again, but at the very least Members of Congress and those in the Executive Branch, including President Obama, should at a minimum read the Introduction, which is just 12 pages long.



Non Sequitur: We Need to Go Back to the Clinton Tax Rates

Posted: Tuesday, Apr 12, 2011 @ 10:18 am | Written by Gene Quinn | 24 comments
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Posted in: Congress, Gene Quinn, Internet, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, US Economy

By now many have undoubtedly heard something about the ongoing budget battles on Capitol Hill. As a government shutdown was averted at the 11th hour on Friday evening, just as I predicted, attention has already started to turn to the much larger economic battles that loom, namely the vote to raise the debt ceiling and the fiscal year 2012 budget. In fact, Congressman Paul Ryan (R-WI) released the House Republican’s budget proposal for fiscal year 2012 early last week. The plan dubbed The Path to Prosperity already has a multitude of supporters and a multitude of critics. As this has started to unfold we will undoubtedly hear some ridiculous, half-baked comments from those who think they know better. The one that probably bothers me the most is one we hear so frequently: All we need to do is go back to the Clinton tax rates. It is amazing to me that there are those who can say this with a straight face.



Tax Policy Makes U.S. Uncompetitive, Not China’s Low Wages

Posted: Monday, Feb 7, 2011 @ 3:02 pm | Written by Henry R. Nothhaft | 12 comments
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Posted in: Business, Guest Contributors, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, US Economy

President Obama delivers his weekly address on Feb. 5, 2011

In his February 5th radio address, President Obama noted that “If we make America the best place to do business, businesses should … set up shop here, and hire our workers, and pay decent wages, and invest in the future of this nation. That’s their obligation.”

I agree. But government has an obligation, too. Is it doing all it can to truly make America the best place to do business?

Consider Evergreen Solar, which until last month was one of America’s largest solar panel makers. On January 14th, it shut down its Massachusetts factory and sent 800 jobs to China. This leaves only Silicon Valley’s Solyndra making solar panels in the U.S., and it just shut down one of its two production facilities.