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Posts Tagged: thomas edison


Perhaps Edison’s most famous invention was the light-bulb. Truth be told, however, Edison didn’t really “invent” the light-bulb. Edison significantly improved upon the technology by developing a light-bulb that used a lower current electricity, a small carbonized …

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Granville Woods is often referred as “The Black Edison.” Woods and Thomas Edison went to court twice over what were apparently invention disputes. Both times, Woods won. There’s even a story, perhaps “folklore,” that Edison asked Woods to …

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On January 27, 1880, Thomas Edison received U.S. Patent No. 223,898, which was simply titled "Electric Lamp." Perhaps Edison's most famous inventions were the phonograph, motion pictures and the light-bulb. Truth be told, however, Edison didn't really "invent" the lightbulb, but …

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Those that do the complaining erroneously state that they speak on behalf of the entire industry. But I know they don't speak for IBM, or Qualcomm or Tessera or the many other innovative companies that exist in the high-tech …

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United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO), the National Science Foundation (NSF), and NBC Learn, the educational arm of NBC News, today launched an 11-part “Science of Innovation” series to coincide with the 165th birthday of American inventor Thomas …

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Right now the best business to be in at the moment is the patent enforcement business, at least if you are concerning yourself with low-risk monetization with high reward. Between the legacy issue of bad patents, patent auctions and …

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In short, today’s smartphone patent wars are simply “back to the future” when it comes to how disruptive new industries are developed. Every major technological and industrial breakthrough in U.S. history — from the Industrial Revolution to the …

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In my experience, the passion to invent is stirred by two things: dissatisfaction with an existing product or service (i.e., too large, too slow, too expensive, too difficult to use), or a dream and desire to create something …

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Lemley’s response introduces the new term “sequential improvement.” This suggests to us that he has now abandoned many of his claims of “simultaneous invention.” The word ‘sequential’ does not occur a single time in his article. We agree …

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If you actually read my article you will find that I simply don’t say the things they claim I say. The basic refrain of the Howells-Katznelson paper is that (1) I think Edison and the Wright brothers didn’t …

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For example, regarding Thomas Edison, Lemley’s primary case illustrating the so-called “myth of the sole inventor,” he alleges that “Sawyer and Man invented and patented the incandescent light bulb” (Lemley 2011, p26) and that “Edison did not invent the …

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The canonical story of the lone genius inventor is largely a myth. Edison didn’t invent the light bulb; he found a bamboo fiber that worked better as a filament in the light bulb developed by Sawyer and Man, …

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