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Posts Tagged ‘ us senate ’

Will Obama Nominate Anyone for the USPTO?

Posted: Tuesday, Aug 5, 2014 @ 12:24 pm | Written by Gene Quinn | 2 comments
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Posted in: Congress, Gene Quinn, Government, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patents, USPTO, White House

Senator Chuck Schumer (D-NY)

In recent weeks news has come out that Phil Johnson’s nomination as Director of the United States Patent and Trademark Office is dead. It seems to be dead due to the protest of at least one Senator on the Senate Judiciary Committee, not because the onerous vetting process produced any red flags or because the White House has lost interest. The Senator allegedly unhappy is Senator Chuck Schumer (D-NY).

Johnson, a strong proponent for patent reform, publicly questioned the need for expanding covered business method (CBM) review, which has long been a pet cause of Shumer’s. Schumer is on record as supporting CBM and wanting to expand the reach of this post grant patent challenge. It is believed Schumer is so invested in CBM because those primarily using CBM are banks and other financial institutions, which is where Schumer receives much of his considerable financial backing and political support. More recently Schumer has also been lobbied by App developers and others who would like CBM review to become available to challenge all software patents.

If the news of resistance on the Senate Judiciary Committee is true the question then turns to whether anyone qualified for the job of Director of the USPTO could be confirmed. Virtually everyone in the industry questioned the wisdom behind expanding CBM review; Phil Johnson was hardly an outlier on that subject. In fact, even Microsoft and Apple broke off from the Google/Cisco high tech collaboration to question the wisdom of expanded CBM review. It was a bad idea to expand CBM. If support for expanding CBM becomes a litmus test then it seems unlikely that a candidate will emerge that is both acceptable to those who adhere to the Google/Cisco orthodoxy and who would also be acceptable to pharma/biotech and the rest of the patent community that needs strong patents and a fully functioning patent system.



Patent Reform Dead – Off the Senate Agenda

Posted: Wednesday, May 21, 2014 @ 5:31 pm | Written by Gene Quinn | 14 comments
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Posted in: Congress, Gene Quinn, Government, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patent Reform, Patents

Senator Patrick Leahy

UPDATED May 21, 2014 @ 5:48pm ET

The writing has been on the walls for some time, as the Senate Judiciary Committee has repeatedly failed to produce a revised version of S. 1720, the Senate version of patent reform. Over the past several months an announcement would come that the Senate Judiciary Committee would be releasing a Managers’ Amendment to the pending legislation, only to have that postponed time after time. Today, Senator Patrick Leahy (D-VT) announced what many have been expecting for weeks, namely that patent reform would be tabled due to lack of consensus. But Leahy’s announcement went further, noting that not only would the Committee not release the long awaited updated version of the bill, but that patent reform would be removed from the Committee calendar altogether.

While Senator Leahy said that he hopes to be able to return to patent reform this year, the legislative calendar does not look good. Now removed from the Committee calendar patent reform seems to dead for this Congress.

No vote will be taken on the Senate version of patent reform until the next draft is released and voted on by the Judiciary Committee, which doesn’t seem likely to happen anytime soon. Then if the Senate does pass patent reform it is guaranteed to be different than the version passed by the House of Representatives. Ordinarily one might suspect that would lead to a Conference between the House and Senate, but Judiciary bills are rarely, if ever, sent to Conference. That means even if the Senate passes patent reform the bill would bounce back to the House, and we could see an ensuing game of ping-pong, with greatly intensified lobbying by both sides. All the while legislative days are dwindling, and useful legislative days in advance of the November election are even more limited. Indeed, with this announcement today it seems that patent reform is now dead for 2014. The only hope proponents have is that patent reform will sneak back in a lame duck session of Congress, but I believe that hope to be somewhat far-fetched.



Patent Legislation Gives FTC Power to Regulate Demand Letters

Posted: Monday, Mar 31, 2014 @ 8:46 am | Written by Andrew Baluch | 18 comments
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Posted in: Congress, Federal Trade Commission, Guest Contributors, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patent Reform, Patents

Senator Claire McCaskill (D-MO).

On Thursday, March 27, 2014, the Senate Judiciary Committee held another meeting on patent reform legislation.  A markup of Senator Leahy’s bill (S. 1720, “Patent Transparency and Improvements Act”) may happen as early as this week.  During Thursday’s meeting Senator Leahy, who Chairs the Committee, indicated a willingness to incorporate in his bill other provisions from Senator Cornyn’s and Senator Hatch’s bills.

Momentum is clearly building for more patent legislation, but the myriad bills and provisions make it difficult even for folks close to Capitol Hill to keep track of them all.  To fill that need, today’s post is part of a series of articles based on the white paper, Patent Reform 2014.  IPWatchdog.com has already published articles on Joinder of Interested Parties and Loser-Pays Fee-Shifting. Today’s focus is on the proposed FTC enforcement provisions found in several pending bills.

In September 2013, Senator Klobuchar’s staff circulated draft language that would require the FTC to initiate a rulemaking proceeding, in accordance with 5 U.S.C. §553, to prohibit the assertion or enforcement of patents in a manner that is an unfair method of competition, or unfair or deceptive act or practice, under section 5 of the Federal Trade Commission Act (15 U.S.C. 45).



Congress and the Court: Loser-Pay Fee Shifting

Posted: Tuesday, Mar 25, 2014 @ 4:54 pm | Written by Andrew Baluch | 2 comments
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Posted in: Congress, Guest Contributors, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patent Reform, Patents, US Supreme Court

Editorial Note: This article is a portion of a larger work by Andrew Baluch titled Patent Reform 2014, modified here for purposes of publication on IPWatchdog.com. Baluch’s article is a comprehensive review of pending legislation developments in Congress, the Executive Branch, the Courts and the States. For more specifically on fee-shifting please also see Will Fee Shifting Solve the Patent Troll Problem?

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U.S. patent litigation has followed the centuries-old “American Rule” under which each party to a litigation pays its own legal fees and costs, regardless whether it wins or loses the litigation.  A narrow exception exists in patent cases, but only in “exceptional cases” under 35 U.S.C. § 285, such as where the losing party engaged in litigation misconduct, or if the patent was fraudulently procured, or if the losing party raised arguments that were both objectively baseless and made in bad faith.

Despite the long tradition of litigants paying their own legal fees and costs, Congress has shown interest in changing the playing field and deviating from the American Rule in patent cases. This comes at a time when the U.S. Supreme Court is already considering two cases that relate to the definition of “exceptional cases” in § 285 that may well alter how this existing exception to the American Rule is applied in practice.

What follows is discussion of various legislative proposals relative to fee-shifting, as well as a brief discussion of the two cases currently pending before the Supreme Court.



Unite to Fight Patent Reform Legislation

Posted: Monday, Feb 10, 2014 @ 10:18 am | Written by Randy Landreneau | 59 comments
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Posted in: Congress, Guest Contributors, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patent Reform, Patents

EDITORIAL NOTE: The following article has been posted as an online petition you may sign by visiting IndependentInventorsofAmerica.org. On Friday the United States Senate held additional hearings and seem poised to act relatively quickly on the Senate version of patent reform. For information about how to directly contact your U.S. Senators please see Senators of the 113th Congress.

Randy Landreneau

We represent independent inventors and small patent-based businesses across the country and we are against any patent legislation that includes provisions of the Innovation Act (H.R. 3309) and the many variations and additions under consideration in the Senate. This legislation will levy grave harm upon independent inventors and small patent-based businesses, as well as the investors we need to help commercialize new technologies and to protect our inventions.

The American patent system is a trade between an inventor and society. An inventor discloses an invention for all to see and build upon, and the government grants and protects for the inventor an exclusive right to the invention for a short period. The American patent system was intended to enable anyone, regardless of economic status, race or gender, to profit from the invention of something new and valuable. This system has worked as intended for over 200 years, fueling the creation of the greatest economy in the world.



Reflections on 2013 and Some Thoughts on the Year Ahead

Posted: Monday, Dec 30, 2013 @ 7:55 am | Written by Peter C. Pappas | 4 comments
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Posted in: Guest Contributors, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patent Reform, Patents, USPTO

2013 turned out to be a very big year for IP, and especially patents, and the year took a course that few would have predicted this time last year.  At that time, the senior team at the PTO was primarily focused on the imminent departure of our then-boss, David Kappos, and the end of what had clearly been an extraordinarily active and successful tenure.  The AIA had been almost entirely implemented, the new Patent Trial and Appeal Board was up and running, and most of us expected 2013 to be focused on implementation and execution of the AIA and the other initiatives that had been set in motion under Director Kappos.

But things turned out rather differently.  Nobody would have predicted a year ago that President Obama would personally call for additional patent reform legislation to curb patent troll litigation.  Or that a comprehensive patent litigation reform bill would speed through the House by a lopsided margin and be heading to Senate consideration with a full head of steam.  Nobody also would have predicted that the USPTO would also fall victim to sequestration and once again be denied full access to its fees so shortly after the passage of the AIA, which held forth the promise of full access to fees.  And few would have predicted that the PTO would be without stable political leadership since Dave Kappos left eleven months ago.  Or that a new Chief of Staff and a new Deputy and Acting Director would be named before a new Director was nominated.  This unusual and lengthy transition period has caused understandable concern in the IP community, but we should all be pleased that a new Acting Director has been named and will take the reins on an acting basis in just two weeks.



Patent Erosion 2013: What Would the Founding Fathers Think?

Posted: Sunday, Dec 29, 2013 @ 11:22 am | Written by Gene Quinn | 26 comments
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Posted in: Congress, Gene Quinn, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patents, US Economy

James Madison, father of the Constitution and proponent of strong patent rights.

As the end of 2013 approaches and I look back on what has transpired I am saddened to see that through the year patent rights have continued to erode. It is difficult to comprehend just how far the pendulum has swung. At one time strong patent rights were viewed by our Founding Fathers as obviously necessary. Now any patent rights are ridiculed as a relic of the past that simply stands in the way of innovation. The reality, however, is that patents don’t stand in the way of innovation; patents foster innovation. But so many won’t even take the time to inform themselves. Rather they equate “innovation” with a new consumer product. But to innovate is to do something new. Innovation has nothing in and of itself to do with a new products or services.

What those urging a weaker patent system want is the ability to release products and establish services regardless of whether they are infringing others. But those who infringe are not innovators, at least not in the most broad sense. Sure, they may have improved something, but if they are infringing then what they have done is copy an innovator. How and why that isn’t self-evident is a mystery. Copying is not innovating!

And if patents were getting in the way of innovation then why aren’t we seeing a standstill in the smartphone industry? The arguments made by the anti-patent crowd are ridiculous on their face, yet decision makers just nod their head in agreement as if they speak the gospel. The truth is the smartphone industry started with the iPhone in late 2007. It is just 6 years old! The phones from 2007 look and function nothing like the smartphones do today, and every new version has new improvements, better battery life, stronger structural integrity, glass that is harder to break, operates faster, has better cameras, etc. etc. For an area that is allegedly being suffocated by  patents there sure is a lot of readily apparent improvement.



Let the AIA Reforms Have an Opportunity to Prove They Work

Posted: Tuesday, Dec 17, 2013 @ 4:30 pm | Written by Q. Todd Dickinson | Comments Off
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Posted in: AIPLA, America Invents Act, Congress, Guest Contributors, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patent Reform, Patents

What follows is a portion of the written statement of Q. Todd Dickinson, Executive Director of the American Intellectual Property Law Association, republished here with permission. Mr. Dickinson testified today at the Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on “Protecting Small Businesses and Promoting Innovation by Limiting Patent Troll Abuse.” To read Mr. Dickinson’s full prepared statement please see Testimony of Q. Todd Dickinson.

Q. Todd Dickinson, Executive Director of the American Intellectual Property Law Association.

A recurring theme that can be traced through the patent reforms of the AIA to the current debate over patent litigation abuse is the issue of patent quality. A key component of the reported abuses is the assertion of allegedly invalid or overbroad patents, the very abuse for which AIA post-grant procedures were created, in order to improve patent quality. These matters of patent quality are being addressed by the changes made to the law by the Judiciary and by Congress in the AIA, which are only now beginning to be felt.4 It may well be premature to conclude that they are not doing the job.

Take one major example, as a former Director of the USPTO in particular, I would support, as former Director Kappos did, giving the post-grant processes in the USPTO a chance to work.

They have only been in place for less than two years, and in the case of PGR, less than one.5 Early data suggests that they are performing in many ways as Congress intended, at least at the macro level, to provide an efficient, less expensive means to address potentially low quality patents. We believe that the prudent course is to give these reforms the chance to demonstrate their efficacy to deal with the concerns for which they were created before we consider making significant additional changes which may have their own unintended consequences. In support of this proposition to wait and see how they are working, we would simply point out that the AIA itself requires that USPTO study the reforms implemented by the AIA and report back to Congress by September 16, 2015. Those reports would serve as an important and more empirically-driven body of data which would allow for greater clarity and direction in making any necessary changes.



Senate Confirms Raymond Chen to Federal Circuit

Posted: Thursday, Aug 1, 2013 @ 5:52 pm | Written by Gene Quinn | 1 Comment »
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Posted in: Congress, Federal Circuit, Gene Quinn, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patents, USPTO

Judge Raymond Chen of the United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit.

Earlier today, at precisely 12:27pm ET, by a vote of 97 – 0, the United States Senate confirmed Raymond T. Chen to be a judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit. Chen was nominated by President Barack Obama on February 7, 2013.

Prior to becoming the newest member of the Federal Circuit, Chen was the Deputy General Counsel for Intellectual Property Law and Solicitor at the United States Patent and Trademark Office. In this role, he defended the Under Secretary of Commerce and Director of the USPTO and the agency in court. By all accounts he was also a trusted senior member of the USPTO senior management team.

Prior to becoming Solicitor and Deputy General Counsel at the USPTO, Chen was an Associate Solicitor for 10 years. In this capacity he represented the USPTO’s decisions in federal court, briefing and arguing numerous cases before the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit.



Pharma Law and Business – A Monthly Roundup December 2012

Posted: Thursday, Dec 13, 2012 @ 12:05 pm | Written by Ed Silverman | Comments Off
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Posted in: Business, Ed Silverman, Guest Contributors, IP News, IPWatchdog.com Articles, Patents, Pharmaceutical

Litigation always factors into the pharmaceutical world, but the US Supreme Court commanded a special place in recent days. The high court figured in no fewer than four contentious issues that, not surprisingly, play a vital role in how drug makers can and will operate.

Let’s start with a case that is not yet before the court, but many predict will be headed there thanks to one of its earlier rulings. Earlier this month, a three-judge panel of the US Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit overturned the conviction of a former sales representative, who argued that prosecuting him for remarks made about off-label use violated his free speech rights.

In their decision, the 2-to-1 majority cited a US Supreme Court ruling early last year that struck down a highly controversial Vermont law, which restricted the sale of prescription drug data identifying prescribers and patients for commercial marketing purposes. Specifically, the court ruled that “speech in aid of pharmaceutical marketing… is a form of expression protected by… the First Amendment.”