Christmas Gifts for Patent Attorneys and Inventors

By Gene Quinn
December 21, 2019

Christmas is in just a few days, but if you’re looking for gifts for the patent attorneys, engineers, scientists or inventors in your life, you may still be able to get many of these gifts just in time, with a little help from Amazon Prime or express shipping. You can check the complete Amazon.com holiday delivery calendar here.

Here are a few can’t-miss gifts for your consideration, updated slightly from our 2018 list. Happy shopping!

Patent Wall Art

Personalized Signs by Lone Star Art has a tremendous selection of patent wall art, either 8 x 10 or 11 x 14 unframed. If you go to the patents in question you will notice that the orientation of some of the images has been changed to make the wall art more aesthetically pleasing (i.e., rotating the image from the vertical axis to the horizontal axis). Whatever you invent, whatever you work on as a patent attorney, they have classic patents available. Here are some of the ones that particularly caught my attention.

Patented Toys & Games1

 

Books

 

Marvel Encyclopedia Bad Blood Patents that shaped the world

Mugs

 

Engineer good with math Photography patent mug
Protecting IP Best patent attorney best patent attorney travel mug

Other Suggestions

 

Newton's Cradle Jupiter Scales of Justice Clock Scales of Justice Cuff Links
Pi pan
Wine cork letter all you need is a good attorney Whiskey decanter https://www.cafepress.com/+keep_calm_im_a_patent_agent_sled_ornament,498353421

 

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[1] These items in this section were at one time patented, but for many the patent has long since expired. Bunch O Balloons, however, remains patented and is one of the most popular toys in the world.

The Author

Gene Quinn

Gene Quinn is a Patent Attorney and Editor and President & CEO ofIPWatchdog, Inc.. Gene founded IPWatchdog.com in 1999. Gene is also a principal lecturer in the PLI Patent Bar Review Course and Of Counsel to the law firm of Berenato & White, LLC. Gene’s specialty is in the area of strategic patent consulting, patent application drafting and patent prosecution. He consults with attorneys facing peculiar procedural issues at the Patent Office, advises investors and executives on patent law changes and pending litigation matters, and works with start-up businesses throughout the United States and around the world, primarily dealing with software and computer related innovations. is admitted to practice law in New Hampshire, is a Registered Patent Attorney and is also admitted to practice before the United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit. CLICK HERE to send Gene a message.

Warning & Disclaimer: The pages, articles and comments on IPWatchdog.com do not constitute legal advice, nor do they create any attorney-client relationship. The articles published express the personal opinion and views of the author and should not be attributed to the author’s employer, clients or the sponsors of IPWatchdog.com. Read more.

Discuss this

There are currently 6 Comments comments. Join the discussion.

  1. angry dude December 21, 2019 12:42 pm

    “Flash of Genius” DVD – a must watch movie for every member of Congress

    There is also good movie “Idiocracy” about the future of this country if nothing gets done and things continue to slide down

  2. Ternary December 21, 2019 5:57 pm

    Three things:
    When using quotes, as an inventor I am always reminded of Thomas Huxley’s:
    1) “The great tragedy of science – the slaying of a beautiful hypothesis by an ugly fact.” Some of my (what I thought were ) “great ideas” unfortunately have met this fate.

    2) Looking at the invention posters, I am struck by the “materialistic” nature of what people imagine to be true inventions. One great invention that drives secure information exchange over the Internet is Diffie-Hellman key exchange. It would show something like (g^a)^b=(g^b)^a. It is a true and patented invention. When shown on a poster, people would probably wonder why this was such an essential and cool invention. But like other computer implemented inventions, it drives the economy.

    Which brings me to point 3.
    3) explaining to people why computer implemented inventions, like RSA and Diffie-Hellman are and should be patent eligible, is a difficult and challenging task. I applaud IPWatchDog for continuing to put and keep the issue of patent eligibility on the forefront. I truly believe it is in no small part thanks to Gene and his team and to all commenters on IPWatchdog that this issue has not disappeared from discussions due to indifference and complexity.

    So a well deserved “thank you” to the IPWatchDog team and all participants for their efforts and activities in 2019. I am looking forward to a continuing focus on patent eligibility (and other patent issues) in 2020 on this great site. Happy Holidays and 2020 to all.

  3. angry dude December 21, 2019 7:45 pm

    Ternary@2

    The year is almost 2020 and pretty much everything is computer-implemented/( simulated, prototyped etc)…except Bunch-of-Balloons

    Why is that such a big f#$%^g problem for people to understand ?
    And maybe those kinds of people should be excluded from discussion …like underage children are excluded from serving on jury duty or voting

    Anyway, let’s hope for the better but prepare for the worst

    Merry Christmas

  4. Anon December 21, 2019 11:47 pm

    Ternary @ 2,

    I will gladly include you in that “and all participants” for your spot on commentary and what is truly a gift of presenting technical aspects in a very approachable manner.

  5. Concerned December 22, 2019 8:55 am

    I think people disingenuously argue and compare situations that computerize a known solution with situations where a computer is used toward a never achieved accomplishment.

    Those disingenuous people know the difference yet game the situation for their desired result. For example, the illogical reasoning that a process must improve the computer hardware is an argument to distract from the underlying solution that escaped all the experts. These people ran with Alice which never barred a patent on new and useful solution regardless of what tool was used, a generic computer or a trunk monkey.

    I even get the argument that I would never get my patent in their opinion which said opinion readily admits that their statement is outside patent law. Where is my trunk monkey?

  6. Les is more December 22, 2019 8:52 pm

    Thank you for posting this! The PTO itself has a fun little gift shop with patent AND trademark related gifts. Sadly, they are not online. My favorite is the coffee mug with the patent for the French press printed on it. You can find something similar at https://society6.com/product/espresso-patent-artwork_mug?sku=s6-11019557p30a27v199

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