IP Goes Pop

Patents, trademarks, and copyrights are often referenced in popular movies, television and songs. IP Goes Pop explores the interface between intellectual property and popular culture. Who owns the rights to creative expression? How long does a patent last? Do the media get it right when reporting on intellectual property issues? What makes a trade secret truly secret? Hosted by Volpe Koenig intellectual property attorneys Michael Snyder and Joseph Gushue, with guest colleagues, inventors, writers, and creators, this lively podcast discusses intellectual property with a pop culture twist.

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IP Goes Pop! Ep #4: Intellectual Property in the Cartoon World of the Simpsons – Brands and Inventions in the Springfield Universe

  August 6, 2021

Welcome to this week’s episode of IP Goes Pop! hosted by Volpe Koenig intellectual property attorney Michael Snyder.

In this episode, Mike is joined by fellow Volpe Koenig Shareholder, Randy Huis, to talk about inventions and technology in the popular cartoon world of “The Simpsons” television show. Mike and Randy dive headfirst into the fictional town of Springfield to discuss some of the wacky and creative ideas and inventions, and whether they could be protected in “real life.” From designing his own car to inventing an automatic hammer and an untippable chair, what IP rights would Homer Simpson have in the real world?

Listen in as Mike and Randy discuss patents, design patents, the internet, holograms, and more.

On this episode:

  • Cartoons and IP
  • Inventions in the Springfield Universe
  • Overview of design patents
  • Famous inventors, older inventions, and public use
  • Prior art and Inventorship
  • Patent term and expiration
  • When the cartoon world meets the legal world
  • The Internet and Domain Names
  • Character Rights

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