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January 10, 2022

IP Goes Pop! Season 2, Episode #7: Down in the Silicon Valley

IP Goes PopThis week on IP Goes Pop!  fellow Volpe Koenig Shareholder Ryan O’Donnell joins co-hosts Michael Snyder and Joseph Gushue to explore the technical world of the TV show Silicon Valley, the intellectual property (IP) challenges faced by fictional compression algorithm company Pied Piper, and how realistic those challenges are to those of real-world tech startups.

Michael, Joe, and Ryan consider “what they could have done” in connection with the IP tropes presented through some of the IP-heavy Silicon Valley episodes. They compare and contrast what happens in the show with the way real-world start-ups approach similar scenarios. As Michael, Joe and Ryan discuss various hypotheticals from the show, this episode dives into a discussion of inventorship and the importance of claim language.

Next, this episode focuses on the difficulties associated with patent litigation including responding to cease and desist letters and IP audits. From patent clearance and licensing, to trademarks, to copyrights, to identifying the different legal entities involved in possible IP disputes, this podcast episode underscores how important it is to know your IP rights from the very start of any venture.

In this episode:

  • The TV series Silicon Valley
    • Season 4, Episode 3, IP Ownership and Clearance Issues
      • Inventorship
      • Claim construction
    • Season 4, Episode 7, IP Licensing Issues
      • Patent Licensing Terms
      • Litigation Costs
      • IP audits
      • Cross licensing
    • Works made for hire
    • Shop rights
    • How to handle incoming and departing employees

 

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