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John F. Martin

is responsible for CPA Global’s worldwide sales, field marketing and growth strategies. He is also Chief Executive Officer of Innography, where, in recent years, he has tripled the company’s growth rate, and led major product advances and global expansion. At IQNavigator, John served in C-level roles, helping drive 50-fold revenue growth. He was head of products at Saba Software and CSG Systems, and a management consultant at McKinsey & Co. John earned an MBA from Stanford and two engineering degrees from MIT.

Recent Articles by John F. Martin

Are You Maximizing Your Intellectual Property? Generating more value in the innovation era

Today’s pace of innovation and competitive intensity demand greater protection of new ideas and inventions. Yet intellectual property (IP) management is not a high business priority for many companies. Organizations that fail to recognize IP as a strategic asset put their competitive advantage and profit margins at risk. Companies can circumvent these potentially adverse impacts by maximizing the value of their creativity. Prioritizing and protecting IP assets helps organizations stay in front of competitors and drive greater growth.

The Myth of the 18-Month Delay in Publishing Patent Applications

Starting in November 2000, the USPTO started publishing patent applications 18 months after their earliest filing date. So the simple assumption is that you file a patent and 18 months later it get publicized, right? However, since the US has moved to a first-to-file System, the “earliest filing date” is really 18 months after the earliest priority date or an application can take advantage of the 12-month grace period could be published as early as 6 months after filing.

Sued by a Patent Troll? How to Respond to Demand Letters

Also rising at an alarming rate are the number of infringement assertions, which can often take the form of a threatening letter that goes over the top and even crosses the line into open misrepresentation… There is no more alarming moment for an accused infringer than the moment the demand letter arrives. While large entities are sued frequently and it is part of doing business in America, a small business receiving a demand letter that alleges patent infringement may be the first time it has faced this reality. An understandable initial reaction is to get in touch with the party sending the demand letter and just explain that you are not infringing. However, if you have been sued by a company legitimately characterized as a patent troll, a lack of infringement may be of no consequence, as the patent troll may continue to require a choice between a license and a more-costly lawsuit defense.