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Raymond Van Dyke

Technology and Intellectual Property Attorney, Patent Practitioner, Van Dyke Intellectual Property Law

Raymond Van Dyke is an Attorney and Educator. In his practice he helps a variety of clients in their IP matters. He specializes in patent, trademark and copyright matters in various technologies, litigation, licensing, and procurement. After being a partner in big firms, in 2010 he started his own IP consultancy in Washington, DC, with diverse domestic and international clientele and technologies, handling matters at the USPTO, Federal Circuit and local State and Federal courts. He teaches an IP course for engineers, businesspeople and other professionals at Southern Methodist University, where he is an Adjunct Professor, and also teaches at NIH and other institutions. He is the Chair of the DC Chapter of LES; an AIPLA Fellow and former Chair of a number of Committees; recent Chair of the Montgomery County Bar Association IP Section, an Officer in the Maryland State bar Association’s Intellectual Property Section, former Board Member of the DC Chapter of the ACM.

Recent Articles by Raymond Van Dyke

Silent Summer: What COVID-19 Means for the Class of 2020

Law firms are not at all immune to this pandemic since their clients aren’t.  Most law firms have cut partner pay, and cut the pay of associates also.  They are also firing and furloughing partners and associates.  We all know that most of Society cares not that lawyers suffer, economically that is.  But there is a class of lawyers, actually lawyers-to-be, that we should have sympathy and empathy for: incoming first year associates.  The Class of 2020 will have a very tough time, even tougher than the Classes of the last downturn in 2008 and 2009.  The associates that suffered then are likely partners now, and have more empathy.

In Support of Inaugurating February 7 as ‘World e Day’

Mathematics is a fascinating subject to some people, but a horror to most. Formulas and rules abound to govern purely abstract relationships that appear alien to ordinary life. Yet, mathematical laws govern our entire world, and the Universe. Physicist Max Tegmark believes that the Universe is itself entirely mathematics, i.e., we are all elaborate formulas in some metaverse. Embedded within the mathematical laws are inscrutable constants, such as pi and e, where e is the so-called base of the natural logarithm. e is roughly 2.718281828…. Although Pi (3.14159…) has an official day, 3-14, or March 14, e has yet to acquire this honor. Last year, I wrote in honor of World Pi Day. This year, I propose making 2-7, or February 7, National or World e Day.

The Categorical Imperative for Innovation and Patenting

In his Categorical Imperative, Kant simplifies a moral argument position for an individual by asking a question: if you thought that your position or Statement would be Universal, i.e., applicable to all people, it would have the stance of a Categorical Imperative and thus you must do it. A proposed Categorical Imperative is the following Statement: creators should be protected against the unlawful taking of their creation by others… Allowing the free taking of ideas, content and valuable data, i.e., the fruits of individual intellectual endeavor, would disrupt capitalism in a radical way. The resulting more secretive approach in support of the above free-riding Statement would be akin to a Communist environment where the State owned everything and the citizen owned nothing, i.e., the people “consented” to this.

The Patent System and Quantum Mechanics: Two Uncertainties

Our patent system was also been built upon classical rules and understandings, e.g., earlier patent systems, and the thoughts of Rousseau, Locke and others who influenced our Founders in the creation of our patent system. For over 200 years our patent system has been operating within the paradigm or mindset that innovation should be encouraged by providing a personal incentive to benefit the innovator (in the short term) and Society as a whole (over the long term). This reality, however, is now under question, i.e., the George Washington Interpretation that a patent system is good for the nation.

Past Events with Raymond Van Dyke

Free Webinar: The History of Technology: From fire to fiber optic

November 2, 2020 @ 10:00 am - 11:00 am EST