IPWatchdog.com is in the process of transitioning to a newer version of our website. Please be patient with us while we work out all the kinks.

Posts Tagged: "data exclusivity"

Clinical Trials and Tribulations: Why IP Protection is Critical to the Future of Biologic Medicine

Given the importance of intellectual property rights to economic growth and technological development, as well as the wider benefits of biopharmaceutical research, the provisions found in the recently negotiated Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) Agreement to protect biologic medicines are disappointing… As clinical trials become increasingly costly, these costs are increasingly born by the biopharmaceutical industry. A recent study from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health calculates that the biopharmaceutical drug and medical device industry now funds six times more clinical trials than the federal government.

IP Protection for Biologics in the TPP: Trading Away Future Treatments and Cures

Globally there are approximately 7,000 medicines in development to treat and cure a wide variety of diseases. Of these, more than 5,000 are in development in the United States. It’s difficult to argue that the strength and success of the U.S. biopharmaceutical industry is uncorrelated with the IP protection available here. It is, therefore, disappointing that the recently negotiated Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) Trade Agreement fails to deliver sufficient IP protection for biologics. Much of the continuing controversy plaguing the TPP Agreement surrounds data exclusivity protection for biologic medicines and the future of the agreement may hinge on precisely this issue.

Trans-Pacific Partnership – What do IP practitioners need to know?

Trade partners negotiating the Tans-Pacific Partnership trade deal have reached an agreement. The agreement details have not been released, and likely will not be submitted to Congress for a mandatory review for at least a month, perhaps longer… Presently the United States provides 12 years of data exclusivity for these types of medicines, but the TPP agreement reportedly knocks that term of protection down to 5 years. While the term of data exclusivity is not one in the same with reducing the term of market exclusivity, there is little doubt that more limited data exclusivity would likely lead to significant negative consequences for the bio-pharma industry.

Obama Administration Caves on Data Exclusivity in Historic TPP Trade Deal

In order to reach an agreement the United States granted a key concession relating to biologics, which are advanced medicines made from living organisms. Presently the United States provides 12 years of data exclusivity for these types of medicines, but the TPP agreement knocks that term down to 5 years. Sources have confirmed to me that a TPP deal that so substantially reduced biologic data exclusivity will face an uphill battle in Congress.

The Need for Regulatory Data Protection in the TPP: Why Australia’s Got it All Wrong

While patents protect innovations that are novel, nonobvious and useful, data exclusivity protects the extensive preclinical and clinical trial data required to establish new therapies as safe and effective. Regulatory data protection safeguards this data for a limited period of time, preventing competing firms from free-riding on the data that was generated at great expense. Specifically, biosimilar firms seeking regulatory approval are required to produce their own preclinical and clinical trial data to establish safety and efficacy, or wait the set period of time after which they are able to utilize the innovator’s prior approval in an abbreviated regulatory approval, eliminating the need for independently generated data.

The Sticking Point that Shouldn’t Be: The Role of Pharmaceutical Patents in the TPP Negotiations

The controversy swirling around the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) Trade Agreement sheds light on two critically important but divisive issues: international trade and intellectual property protection for pharmaceuticals. One of the most significant sticking points in the negotiations is the issue of intellectual property protection for pharmaceuticals, specifically data exclusivity. Data exclusivity is a means of correcting a free-riding market failure, providing the innovative firms with a limited period of time in which data from clinical trials and other required testing cannot be used by competing firms to secure market access.

When Patents Aren’t Enough: The Case for Data Exclusivity for Biologic Medicines

Although complementary, patents and data exclusivity protection incentivize innovation in different ways and serve distinct purposes. Patents provide protection for innovations that meet the standards of patentability and are novel, nonobvious, and useful. In the context of biopharmaceuticals, patents protect both breakthrough discoveries as well as incremental improvements. Due to the length of the drug-development and patent-approval processes, effective patent terms rarely correspond to FDA approval. Accordingly, in some cases innovative therapies may experience patent expiry shortly after making it to market. In contrast, data exclusivity protects the tremendous investments of time, talent, and financial resources required to establish a new therapy as safe and effective. This is accomplished by requiring competing firms seeking regulatory approval of the same or a similar product to independently generate the comprehensive preclinical and clinical trial data rather than rely on or use the innovator’s data to establish safety and efficacy of their competing product.

Protecting Data Exclusivity, Protecting the Future of Medicine

Traditionally, “small molecule” drugs are patent protected for a twenty-year term. Biologic medicines, however, are more difficult to comprehensively protect with patents due to their size, complexity, and numerous similar effective variants. This comprehensive protection is critical given the investment and risk associated with biologics. Estimates are that the pre-approval cost of developing a biologic approaches $1.2 billion and that the time needed to recover the pre-approval R&D costs be between 12.9 and 16.2 years. In the United States, the Biologics Price Competition and Innovation Act of 2009 (“Biologics Act”) provides for 12 years of exclusivity for the drugs. Through this, Congress endeavored to fill the void left by patents and trade secrets in the protection of biologics.

Fact vs. Fiction: The Truth on Biologics and Biosimilars

For many months we have been hearing about the government attempts to “reform” health care in the United States, and this weekend the United States Senate is actually working, yes Senators working on a weekend, as the contentious debate continues. Even a relatively rare Presidential visit to Capitol Hill is scheduled for later this afternoon, presumably so President Obama can…