IPWatchdog.com is in the process of transitioning to a newer version of our website. Please be patient with us while we work out all the kinks.

Posts Tagged: "health care"

Severing the Link Between IP and Biomedical Innovation Isn’t the Answer to Global Health Care Challenges

The cost of medicines is on the agenda this week at the World Health Organization’s annual executive board meeting in Geneva. Nongovernmental organizations and certain middle-income countries argue that market-based drug development—reliant on intellectual property rights (IPRs) as its primary incentive—makes medicines too expensive. It fails, they say, to provide cures for those most in need but least able to pay. On the fringes of meetings such as the one happening this week, nongovernmental organizations talk excitedly about a new model for drug development, in which research and development (R&D) costs are “delinked” from the final prices of drugs. They join notables such as U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders and Nobel prize-winning economist Joseph Stiglitz. One of the main “delinkage” proposals is to replace the patent system with government-managed prizes.

What Impact Will Wearable Devices Have on the Healthcare Industry?

Technology integrated with health tools is a becoming a very popular trend within the healthcare industry and is increasingly being used on a more regular basis. Many of the wearable devices are providing a plethora of health data that can be used to inform both personal and clinical decisions for consumers utilize the growing roster of available tools. These popular do-dads range from fitness trackers to wearable heart rate monitors. Many are saying these devices will change the way we live and interact with technology from a physical perspective.

IBM sales slump continues but Watson is getting brighter

Despite shrinking revenues, IBM may be able to chart its way back to stability if success continues for its Watson cognitive computing platform, the corporation’s fastest growing division by revenues and one which is proving applicable to a surprising range of industries. To profile IBM’s recent research and development related to Watson, we thought that we’d profile a series of data analytic and predictive modeling technologies for which IBM has been issued patents. For example, the evaluation of medical diagnoses for evaluating predictionaccuracy is detailed within U.S. Patent No. 9,235,808, entitled Evaluation of Predictions in the Absence of a Known Ground Truth. It claims a method to evaluate a prediction that a patient has a given disease by collecting a plurality of clinical data from each patient.

Distorting Innovation: Fixed Patent Terms and Underinvestment in Long-term Research

Drugs for the treatment of late-stage cancers are less expensive to develop, in part because late-stage drugs extend patients’ lives for a shorter period of time such that clinical trials are concluded more quickly. This means that such drugs require less time to research, develop, test and bring to market than drugs that treat earlier stage cancers, providing the innovator with a longer effective patent life. In essence, less research and development investment is directed toward drugs that treat patient groups requiring lengthy clinical trials, those with longer commercialization lags… It’s worthwhile to ask whether a ‘one-size-fits-all’ patent policy is optimal. How we can think creatively about patent protection in an effort to incentivize the innovation we want and push the frontiers of modern medicine.

Undermining Innovation in Health Care is Bad for Patients

Even if one disregards the categorical distinctions between over-ruling the ITC order and foreign compulsory licenses, there are differences in the specifics as well. For example, the Administration’s decision rested heavily on the fact that the patent being violated was part of an industry standard. A patent that is critical to an industry standard can convey market power (and possibly monopoly power) on that patent holder. The Administration focused on and justified its decision based on avoiding abuse of that market power. Patents on medicine are completely different. There is rigorous competition, new medicines can be invented to treat the same malady, and there is no need for the types of industry standards that are more common in electronics. But it is those health care patents that foreign governments are undermining.

Finding a Fall Guy for Middle East Respiratory Syndrome

Prominent officials in the World Health Organization and Saudi government point at surprising villains allegedly standing in the way of international efforts to combat the spread of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-COV):· The doctor who first recognized the deadly new disease; and
· The medical center which quickly identified the virus.

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital Gets Patent for Genetically Modified Human Immune Cells for Cancer Therapy

As the patent community waits to see whether the United States Supreme Court will deal a significant, perhaps fatal blow, to the patenting of many genetic related innovations in Association of Molecular Pathology v. Myriad Genetics, announcement came this morning of a newly issued U.S. patent. This patent was issued to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. The invention relates to compositions for genetically modifying human immune cells so they can destroy some of the most common forms of cancer in children and adults.

4 More Days Until Election 2012

It is undeniable that the Director Kappos has revitalized the Patent Office, but does the fact that the Patent Office is now well run mean that President Obama has earned 4 more years?

Exclusive Interview: Jim Greenwood, President & CEO of BIO

On Wednesday, April 21, 2010, I had the pleasure of conducting an exclusive, on the record interview with Jim Greenwood, former Congressman and current President & CEO of BIO. It was a treat to chat with Jim Greenwood. Our conversation lasted about 35 minutes, and we talked about his decision to leave Congress to take over at BIO, exciting new technologies BIO companies are working on, healthcare reform, the importance of patents to start-up companies and capital investment requirements. We also learn that he is an avid bird watcher and has started to become a bit of a gym rat.

Health Care Bill Good for BIO According to Greenwood

Notwithstanding the above, I am conflicted in my feelings. It seems that one of the deals included in the Health Care Bill, provisions aimed at biotechnology, are unquestionably good. This is not the type of deal where residents of Nebraska get the rest of us to pay for them, or where seniors in Florida get to keep prescription coverage courtesy of the federal government while seniors everywhere else lose. The provisions favorable to the biotech community will spur innovation, lead to new cures and undoubtedly prolong life. If only Congress could have passed these provisions and scrapped the rest.

Analyzing Patent Reform Chances and First to File Provisions

Patent reform could be of sufficiently low political importance that Democrats and Republicans can get something done. If health care dies the Democrats will need to pass something desperately, perhaps many things, to show they actually accomplished something. Therefore, if health care dies I predict patent reform passes. If health care passes I predict patent reform will die, as the Congress and government slip into heightened posturing in advance of the 2010 elections.

Biotech Provisions in Senate Health Care Bill Promotes Innovation

WASHINGTON, DC (December 24, 2009) – Biotechnology Industry Organization (BIO) President and CEO Jim Greenwood released the following statement on today’s vote by the Senate to pass The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2009: The health care reform bill passed today by the Senate includes many provisions which serve as early Christmas presents for patients living with debilitating…

Fixing America’s Health Care System

On Thursday morning, August 13, 2009, CNBC aired a segment titled Fixing America’s Health Care System on Squawk Box, which is CNBC’s longest running program.  Appearing on the program were Dr. Scott Gottlieb, who is a former FDA deputy commissioner, Tommy Thompson, former Health & Human Services Secretary and Wisconsin Governor and Jim Greenwood, a former Republican Congressman who is…