Posts Tagged: "International Trade Commission"

CAFC Affirms ITC Ruling for 10X Genomics, Finding Bio-Rad Infringed

On April 29, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit (CAFC) affirmed an International Trade Commission (ITC) decision in Bio-Rad Laboratories v. International Trade Commission & 10X Genomics, Inc. finding that Bio-Rad infringed the patent claims at issue; that 10X Genomics (10X) practiced the claims; and rejecting Bio-Rad’s defense that it could not be liable for infringement because it co-owned the asserted 10X patents. 10X filed a complaint against Bio-Rad Laboratories with the ITC, alleging that Bio-Rad violated the Tariff Act of 1930 for importing and selling microfluidic systems and gene sequencing components covered by three of its patents. 19 U.S.C. § 1337. The ITC affirmed the findings of its Administrative Law Judge, who found that Bio-Rad violated the statute and infringed the 10X patents, and determined that the patents were, in fact, being practiced by 10X as required for liability under the statute.

How One ITC Initial Determination Highlights the Links Among a Strong Patent System, Jobs and International Cooperation

An Administrative Law Judge (ALJ) at the International Trade Commission (ITC) recently determined that Samsung Phones violate key patents on magnetic emulator technology for contactless payment systems from Pittsburgh’s Dynamics, Inc. We have been collaborating for years in the academic and public sectors on issues raised in that case, and are consulting consult with Dynamics because we think these issues are vital to our innovation ecosystem, our national economy, and our commitments to international partners. It is especially illustrative of the serious risks facing these vital public interests that far too frequently when there has been a full and fair adjudication determining that there has been infringement of multiple patents and that those patents are neither invalid nor unenforceable, the headline more than suggests that the infringer has been cleared of responsibility.

ITC’s Botox Ruling Could Have Public Interest Implications

Korean company Daewoong and its U.S. counterpart Evolus recently found themselves in a dispute with U.S.-Irish company Allergan and its counterpart Medytox over misappropriation of both a bacterial strain and the manufacturing process to make cosmetic injection products from that strain. Daewoong recently received Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval to market an injection in the United States that competes with Botox, owned by Allergan-Medytox. In order to prevent this entrance into the market, Allergan-Medytox filed a complaint with the International Trade Commission (ITC) to block imports of the new product under Section 337. The only relationship between Allergan and Medytox is an anticompetitive market allocation agreement. Daewoong’s new product posed a threat to the profitability of Allergan’s agreement with Medytox and therefore became the subject of a dispute before the ITC. Importantly, the manufacture of the products occurs in Korea and the injectables are then imported into the United States.

ITC Issues Limited Exclusion Order on Botox Products, Partially Reverses Trade Secret Finding

In September, the International Trade Commission (ITC) decided to review an initial final determination (FID) in the Matter of “Certain Botulinum Toxin Products, Processes for Manufacturing or Relating to Same and Certain Products Containing Same,” Investigation No. 337-TA-1145, a complaint filed by Allergan against Botox products made by Daewoong and its partner, Evolus, a “performance beauty company”. On Wednesday, the ITC issued a Final Determination in the case, finding that the sale and importation of the products into the United States violated Section 337 of the U.S. Tariff Act. The Commission issued a Limited Exclusion Order (LEO) prohibiting importation of the products by Daewoong and Evolus for a period of 21 months, as well as a cease and desist order against Evolus preventing the Company from selling, marketing, or promoting the products in the United States for a period of 21 months. However, the Commission reversed the FID’s finding that a trade secret exists with respect to Medytox’s bacterial strain.

Congress, the ITC and the Biden Administration Must Move Forward to Stop Samsung’s IP Abuse

Last week, years of arguing and contention came to an end. The fight I’m referring to was not a political campaign, but that doesn’t make its impact on our country any less significant – it’s a victory that everyone can celebrate. Finally, the long-running patent litigation battle between TiVo and Comcast is over. Comcast had infringed TiVo’s patents and, to put it simply, was bullying the smaller company by weaponizing their larger legal team. Eventually, the International Trade Commission (ITC) stepped in and the two companies were able to reach a new, long-term licensing agreement. In doing this, a crucial precedent was potentially set – it will arguably harder for massive companies to take advantage of smaller ones.

ITC Decision to Review Final Initial Determination in Botox Case Could Have Big Implications for Trade Secrets

Last week, the United States International Trade Commission (ITC) issued a notice in the Matter of “Certain Botulinum Toxin Products, Processes for Manufacturing or Relating to Same and Certain Products Containing Same,” Investigation No. 337-TA-1145, stating that the ITC has “determined to review in part a final initial determination (FID) of the presiding administrative law judge (ALJ) finding a violation of section 337 of the Tariff Act of 1930.”Last year, Allergan, the U.S. manufacturer of Botox, and Medytox, the Korean manufacturer of a similar product, filed a joint complaint against Daewoong, a Korean drug maker, under Section 337 of the Tariff Act of 1930, alleging that Daewoong had stolen Medytox’s botox strain trade secret in Korea and introduced it to the U.S. market. The FID was issued on July 6, 2020, wherein the ALJ found that certain products sold by the Korean drug maker Daewoong and its partner Evolus, Inc. violated section 337 through their importation and sale in the United States of a botulinum neurotoxin product “by reason of the misappropriation of trade secrets.”

Could COVID-19 Counterfeit Concerns Get Congress to Move Towards Passage of the Counterfeit Goods Seizure Act?

In late July, water bottle maker Hydro Flask and parent company Helen of Troy Limited filed a complaint with the U.S. International Trade Commission (ITC) asking the agency to institute a Section 337 investigation against a series of 25 respondents, most of which are located in China, over their alleged infringement of Hydro Flask’s trademarks and design patents. The legal action highlights the difficulties being faced by many American brand owners during the COVID-19 pandemic and how Congressional action could help to ensure that these small businesses are able to effectively enforce their IP to prevent counterfeit imports.

Federal Circuit Affirms ITC Refusal to Rescind Exclusion Order Due to Assertion of Patent Invalidity

Last week, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit affirmed a decision of the U.S. International Trade Commission in Mayborn Group, Ltd. v. ITC, wherein the U.S. International Trade Commission (the Commission) denied Mayborn’s petition for rescission of a general exclusion order that prohibited the importation of products that infringe U.S. Patent 8,028,850 (the ’850 patent).  The CAFC held that, while Mayborn had standing to appeal, the Commission lacked the authority to adjudicate its patent invalidity claim and an assertion of patent invalidity was insufficient grounds to support a petition to rescind or modify an exclusion order.

Comcast’s Lobbying Won’t Dilute the ITC’s Enforcement Authority

Late last month, TiVo won its second intellectual property battle with Comcast at the International Trade Commission (ITC) and is poised to win a third ruling this summer. The agency issued an exclusion order under Section 337 of the Tariff Act to prevent Comcast from importing digital video receivers that violate TiVo’s Rovi cable box patents. Now, unable to win on the argument that it did not infringe on TiVo’s patents, Comcast is trying again, this time attacking the ITC as an institution.

Federal Circuit’s Ruling Against Comcast Highlights Significance of ITC for Patent Owners

As IPWatchdog reported last week, on March 2, in what can only be characterized as the most significant crackdown against patent evasion in a generation, TiVo Corporation won a groundbreaking U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit ruling against Comcast. The Court’s opinion provides a noteworthy precedent that will spell trouble for the future of Comcast’s business practices, particularly for the company’s upcoming cases with the ITC. More significantly, however, it will protect the authority of the ITC to police similarly profiled instances of patent trolling in the future, which will make the opinion go down in history as one of the most substantial victories for the strength and sanctity of patent evasion in the 21st century

Federal Circuit Upholds ITC Limited Exclusion Order Against Comcast

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit has upheld an International Trade Commission (ITC) ruling granting a limited exclusion order that bars importation of X1 set-top boxes by Comcast, including importation by ARRIS and Technicolor on behalf of Comcast. Although the patents at issue have both expired, the Court refused Comcast’s motion to dismiss, finding that there were “sufficient collateral consequences to negate mootness.”

The Impact of Overturning eBay v. MercExchange

At a time when most policymakers rightly argue that China and other countries need to do more to clamp down on intellectual property infringement, overturning the four-factor eBay test would impose new hurdles and increase the PAE problem that Congress and the Supreme Court have fought to address over that last two decades. The risk that an implementer engages in “efficient infringement” has made the ITC an increasingly attractive forum, for at least some patent owners and notably not PAEs. ITC exclusion orders and cease and desist orders are the last vestige of the exclusivity promised to the right patent owners at the time they are granted a patent. Compared to proposed sections of the STRONGER Patents Act, the ITC strikes a balance between offering at least some patent owners the ability to prevent infringers from engaging in the never-ending game of “efficient infringement” while frustrating PAEs attempts to abuse the exclusionary remedies offered.  Congressional action should be reserved for a time when there is clear evidence that the eBay decision is harming U.S. businesses and those U.S. businesses are unable to obtain the relief they need at the ITC. At this time, there is no such evidence.

Ranking the Top ITC Firms and Attorneys

Last month, we released our first ITC Intelligence Report. For the first time, we ranked ITC law firms and attorneys based on their performance and activity. Our research team analyzed the outcome of 308 ITC Section 337 Investigations, filed from January 1, 2014, through December 1, 2019. For all the terminated cases, we identified the outcome (e.g., violation, no violation, settlement, etc.). Then, depending on the outcome and win/loss of parties (i.e., complainants and respondents), we allocated points to each side, including the law firms and attorneys representing them.

Why eBay v. MercExchange Should, But Won’t, Be Overruled

As anyone who follows the United States Supreme Court knows, the Court has historically been extremely fond of taking important cases with cutting edge issues, only to dodge the real issues and address some insignificant procedural or hyper-technical issue. Such disappointment is all too frequent, so Supreme Court watchers are seldom surprised when the Court passes on an opportunity to breathe clarity into otherwise unsettled waters. But what the Supreme Court did in eBay Inc. v. MercExchange LLC, 547 U.S. 388 (2006) was far more disappointing. In eBay, the Supreme Court decided to throw out longstanding and well-established Federal Circuit jurisprudence and offered little or nothing in its place. The result has been an extraordinary shift in the balance of power between patent owners and infringers.

Obtaining Injunctions Under eBay Versus at the International Trade Commission

Prior to the Supreme Court’s decision in eBay v. MercExchange, 547 US 388 (2006), it was fairly routine for a victorious patent owner who prevailed on a finding of infringement in a federal district court litigation to assume that a permanent injunction would issue to prevent ongoing infringement. Despite the STRONGER Patents Act seeking to overturn eBay, Congress at large has no desire to disturb this Supreme Court decision and any bill that contains a provision overruling eBay cannot be enacted. In light of eBay, the U.S. International Trade Commission (ITC), which has always played a large role in patent litigation and enforcement strategies because of its statutory authority to issue exclusion orders and cease and desist orders, emerged as an important forum for patent owners.