Posts Tagged: "ip"

IPWatchdog Annual Meeting Now VIRTUAL CON2020

IPWatchdog® CON2020 has gone VIRTUAL!   The IPWatchdog® Virtual CON2020 will endeavor to address the issues facing innovators, creators and brand owners as they find it increasingly difficult to monetize their proprietary creations in an economy where many large enterprises no longer want to pay for what they choose to implement and/or sell, and there is scant legal recourse to…

IPWatchdog Annual Meeting Now VIRTUAL CON2020

IPWatchdog® CON2020 has gone VIRTUAL!   The IPWatchdog® Virtual CON2020 will endeavor to address the issues facing innovators, creators and brand owners as they find it increasingly difficult to monetize their proprietary creations in an economy where many large enterprises no longer want to pay for what they choose to implement and/or sell, and there is scant legal recourse to…

IPWatchdog Annual Meeting Now VIRTUAL CON2020

IPWatchdog® CON2020 has gone VIRTUAL!   The IPWatchdog® Virtual CON2020 will endeavor to address the issues facing innovators, creators and brand owners as they find it increasingly difficult to monetize their proprietary creations in an economy where many large enterprises no longer want to pay for what they choose to implement and/or sell, and there is scant legal recourse to…

IPWatchdog Annual Meeting Now VIRTUAL CON2020

IPWatchdog® CON2020 has gone VIRTUAL!   The IPWatchdog® Virtual CON2020 will endeavor to address the issues facing innovators, creators and brand owners as they find it increasingly difficult to monetize their proprietary creations in an economy where many large enterprises no longer want to pay for what they choose to implement and/or sell, and there is scant legal recourse to…

IPWatchdog Annual Meeting Now VIRTUAL CON2020

IPWatchdog® CON2020 has gone VIRTUAL!   The IPWatchdog® Virtual CON2020 will endeavor to address the issues facing innovators, creators and brand owners as they find it increasingly difficult to monetize their proprietary creations in an economy where many large enterprises no longer want to pay for what they choose to implement and/or sell, and there is scant legal recourse to…

IPWatchdog Annual Meeting Now VIRTUAL CON2020

IPWatchdog® CON2020 has gone VIRTUAL!   The IPWatchdog® Virtual CON2020 will endeavor to address the issues facing innovators, creators and brand owners as they find it increasingly difficult to monetize their proprietary creations in an economy where many large enterprises no longer want to pay for what they choose to implement and/or sell, and there is scant legal recourse to…

How China Will Fundamentally Change the Global IP System

Currently, the massive volume of filings at the Chinese Patent Office (CNIPA) exceeds the filings of the next four most active patent offices combined. It portends a rapid shift to Chinese language prior art being the repository of technical teachings around leading edge technologies for the Fourth Industrial Revolution. This will happen for several reasons and much more rapidly than…

Protecting IP Builds Confidence and Encourages Investment in the Future

Protecting IP means securing a portion of a $1.2 trillion industry and the 29 million jobs created directly and indirectly by the mobile connectivity ecosystem. As companies like InterDigital contribute to finalizing the new 5G standard, actions by the Trump Administration to decrease IP theft from China, as well as new policies from the USPTO, are building confidence to encourage investment by U.S. companies that will lead to the development of exciting future technologies. Through smart policy-making and an understanding of the value of these technologies and the standardization process, the U.S. will continue to be a hub for innovation and economy will continue to grow stronger.

New Canadian IP strategy includes money for IP tools and literacy

In a move that recognizes the importance of innovation and IP rights – and the need for diverse audiences to understand how they work – the Canadian government has announced that it is investing $88.3M (CD) to create a new IP strategy that incorporates IP awareness and education.

IP rights are essential ingredients to our innovation system

“Let’s talk a bit about intellectual property rights,” Undersecretary of Commerce and Director of NIST Walter Copan said at the LES Silicon Valley conference on Wednesday, April 25, 2018. “IP rights are American property rights.” This simple, declarative statement by Director Copan was as important as it was direct. These words were spoken on the morning after the United States Supreme Court issued its decision in Oil States v. Greene’s Energy, which rather than saying patents are a property right instead called patents merely a “government franchise.”

U.S. Chamber calls on NAFTA Countries to modernize and elevate IP frameworks

The letter explains that the results from the Chamber’s IP Index has shown that as a whole North America is at a considerable disadvantage compared with both Asia and Europe. “NAFTA modernization is an opportunity to elevate the IP frameworks to a level commensurate with the world’s leading economies – if it fails to put Canada and Mexico among the top 10 countries ranked on the Index it will be a missed opportunity,” the letter reads.

Intellectual Property Plays a Big Role in Silicon Valley Deals

How big of a role does IP play in Silicon Valley deals? “In almost any size transaction involving a technology company, our client asks us to look carefully at the company’s IP and the agreements the company has entered into with third parties to secure rights in IP and to permit others to use that IP,” said John Brockland, a technology and IP transactions partner at Hogan Lovells. “Depending on how a transaction is structured, the terms on which IP is assigned or licensed between the parties in a deal can also be a critical area of focus for our client.”

Apply Evidence-based Approach to Antitrust Law Equally to Innovators and Implementers

As judges, former judges and government officials, legal academics and economists who are experts in antitrust and intellectual property law, we write to express our support for your recent announcement that the Antitrust Division of the Department of Justice will adopt an evidence-based approach in applying antitrust law equally to both innovators who develop and implementers who use technological standards in the innovation industries. We disagree with the letter recently submitted to you on January 24, 2018 by other parties who expressed their misgivings with your announcement of your plan to return to this sound antitrust policy.

USTR: Counterfeit and pirated physical products valued at nearly half a trillion dollars

According to the Office of the United States Trade Representative, imports of counterfeit and pirated physical products are valued at about half a trillion dollars, or about 2.5 percent of all imports around the globe… The recent review of notorious markets by the USTR identifies 43 such markets offering counterfeit or pirated goods either through physical stores or online channels. A total of 25 notorious markets identified in the report operate in the online space as websites either facilitating infringing conduct or lacking consumer privacy safeguards, some of which even enable the installation of malware on consumer computers. This malware can include remote access Trojans (RATs) which can steal sensitive personal information, like bank account information, or gain control of computer hardware.

Conservative Leaders to Trump: 301 investigation of China represents a good first step

Conservative leaders wrote the White House applauding this initiative, based on the property rights implications of IP expropriation. These conservative leaders note that China is hardly the only country that steals American IP, and such IP theft imposes significant costs to our economy, impairs American competitiveness and compromises our innovative future… The letter reads in part: “The 301 investigation represents a good first step toward asserting rules-based accountability and recommitting to an American IP-based competition policy. However, trade enforcement is only one pillar of an American economic competitiveness plan.”