Posts Tagged: "Patrick Kilbride"

Iancu, Kilbride, Israel Separate Fact from Fiction During IPWatchdog LIVE Panel on TRIPS IP Waiver

On Monday of IPWatchdog LIVE in Dallas, a panel on “The TRIPS IP Waiver: Separating Fact & Fiction” was moderated by president and CEO of the PCT learning center and founding partner of Berenato & White, John White, and featured IP leaders Andrei Iancu, Patrick Kilbride, and Chris Israel. The Trade Related Aspects of Intellectual Property (TRIPS) agreement is an international agreement among members of the World Trade Organization (WTO), which sets minimum standards in the international rules governing intellectual property. In 2020, India and South Africa proposed a TRIPS Agreement waiver proposal that would temporarily waive intellectual property rights protections for technologies needed to prevent, contain, or treat COVID-19, including vaccines and vaccine-related products. The proposal has been hotly contested globally, but the Biden Administration said in May of this year that the United States would back it.

U.S. Patent System Jumps to Tie for Second Place in International IP Index

On February 7, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce’s Global Innovation Policy Center (GIPC) released the latest version of its International IP Index assessing the intellectual property environments in 50 world economies. Once again, the United States achieved the top overall ranking as the strongest intellectual property regime in the world. The country’s improved ranking in patent rights—moving from its twelfth-place ranking in 2018 to a tie for second place this year—is particularly notable. However, the United States does find itself tied with 10 other countries for that second-place ranking in patent rights and is just as close to being tied with thirteenth-place Italy as it is to being tied with first-place Singapore.

Global Patent Landscape 2018: Where to File and Why

Join Gene Quinn, patent attorney and founder of IPWatchdog.com, for a free webinar discussion – Global Patent Landscape 2018: Where to File and Why – on Thursday, March 22, 2017, at 12pm ET. Joining Gene will be Patrick Kilbride, Vice President of International Intellectual Property for the U.S. Chamber’s Global Innovation Policy Center.

Supreme Court of Canada rules on Promise Doctrine in favor of Pharma Patent Owners

The Supreme Court of Canada issued a ruling in AstraZeneca Canada Inc. v. Apotex Inc., which gives patent owners a far greater ability to protect their intellectual property in the face of Canada’s Promise Doctrine, a part of Canadian patent law that requires an invention to be “useful” in order to be patent-eligible subject matter. The ruling is being heralded by patent owners, especially those in the pharmaceutical space, and it provides an interesting juxtaposition in contrast to recent United States policy, which has been tipping the scales in the favor of generic drugmakers over branded pharmaceuticals.

A Changing Patent Landscape: U.S. no longer the most patent friendly jurisdiction in the world

At this moment in history almost everything we thought we knew about global patent protection is being challenged. The U.S. is not the most patent friendly jurisdiction in the world, instead being tied for 10th with Hungary, which really puts into perspective the fall from grace patent rights are having in America… There is no doubt that the U.S. continues to take steps backwards due to variety of self- inflicted wounds. The omnipresent threats of more patent reform, a Supreme Court that has created unprecedented uncertainty surrounding what is patent eligible (see e.g., here, here and here), and a Patent Trial and Appeal Board that has been openly hostile to property owners (see e.g., here and here), allows harassment of certain patent owners over and over again, all the while failing in its mission to provide relief from patent trolls. Meanwhile, a number of countries around the world have taken positive steps forward on the patent front, including countries you might not ordinarily consider as patent friendly jurisdictions.