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Posts Tagged: "This Week in Washington IP"

This Week in Washington IP: Votes Rescheduled for Stark and Vidal, Examining the Proposed COVID-19 TRIPS Waiver, and Impacts of Electric Vehicle Investments

This week in Washington IP news, following a cancellation last week, the Senate Judiciary Committee will vote this week on a series of nominations from the Biden Administrations to fill vacancies at both the Federal Circuit and the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. In the House of Representatives, the Oversight Committee explores possible updates to the Federal Information Security Management Act in light of a spate of cyber attacks on federal agencies, while the Agriculture Committee focuses on the impact of electric vehicle investments in U.S. agriculture and rural communities. Elsewhere, the Federalist Society hosts an event with two former USPTO Directors on the potential impacts of the proposed TRIPS waiver for COVID-19 vaccines, and the Information Technology & Innovation Foundation explores the potential of a national strategic-industry policy in helping the U.S. meet the challenges of its competitive economic rival China.

This Week in Washington IP: Accelerating COVID-19 Vaccinations Globally, The Impact of Monopolies on American Innovation, and Compensating Creators in Today’s Content Ecosystem

This week in Washington IP news, both houses of Congress are slowing down prior to the Christmas holiday, but Senate committees will hold hearings on the potential adoption of stablecoins into the U.S. financial system, as well as the impact of consolidation and monopolies on American innovation. In the House, the House Select Subcommittee on the Coronavirus Crisis will debate ways to accelerate global vaccination rates. Elsewhere, the Hudson Institute hosts an event exploring new avenues for compensating copyright owners in the new content ecosystem, while the Information Technology & Innovation Foundation will explore evidence of China’s broken promises on economic policy during its two decades as a member of the World Trade Organization.

This Week in Washington IP: Improving Biomedical Research, Amending Section 230 to Hold Big Tech Accountable, and Promoting Privacy in the Tech Sector

This week in Washington IP news, the House of Representatives will host committee hearings discussing several draft pieces of legislation that would update the 21st Century Cures Act as well as reduce immunity to liability for major tech firms currently enjoyed under Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act. Over in the Senate, the Fiscal Responsibility Subcommittee will discuss how changes to privacy policies in Big Tech firms have impacted targeted advertising activities for a wide swath of the economy. Elsewhere, the Center for Strategic & International Studies hosts a debate on the topic of China’s tech crackdown and its potential impacts on innovation, and the Information Technology & Innovation Foundation will explore whether increased support for advanced renewables research can help the global community meet certain clean energy goals by the middle of this century.

This Week in Washington IP: Leahy Announces He Won’t Run Again; Demystifying Crypto Assets, and Building Resilience Against Ransomware in the United States.

This week in Washington IP events, Senator Patrick Leahy (D-VT), the current Chair of the Senate Judiciary Committee’s Subcommittee on Intellectual Property, announces that he will not seek reelection in 2022; the Joint Congressional Economic Committee gears up for a hearing on demystifying both cryptocurrencies and the federal government’s role in regulating those digital assets. Over in the House of Representatives, the House Energy Committee hosts a mid-week hearing to discuss the potential impacts of supporting research and development in the field of nuclear fusion technology, while the House Oversight Committee explores efforts that U.S. law enforcement officials have been taking to curb the rising threat of ransomware. Elsewhere, The Brookings Institution hosts a conversation with U.S. Labor Secretary Marty Walsh to discuss the impact of 21st century innovations on the American workforce, while the Center for Data Innovation discusses the impact of decisions by major Internet browser providers to end third-party cookies for tracking browser activity.

This Week in Washington IP: Cleaning Up Counterfeit Goods from Online Marketplaces, The Impacts of Automation on the Future of Work, and Digital Trade in the EU

This week in Washington IP news, the Senate Judiciary Committee hosts a hearing Tuesday morning to discuss various legislative efforts designed to address the rampant issue of counterfeit goods sold online by third-party sellers on major e-commerce platforms. Over in the House of Representatives, the House Select Committee on Economic Disparity takes a closer look at technological automation and its likely impacts on the future of work in America, while the House Financial Technology Task Force examines issues with the growing “buy now, pay later” fintech sector. Elsewhere, the Center for Data Information examines how online advertising has helped grow the European economy, while the Center for Strategic & International Studies provides a critique of the EU’s Digital Markets Act and unintended economic consequences that may come from the EU’s passage of that bill.

This Week in Washington IP: Deregulating Agricultural Biotechnology, State Sovereign Immunity and IP Infringement, and Copyright Law in Artificial Intelligence

This week in Washington IP events, the U.S. House of Representatives hosts a pair of committee hearings on tech subjects, including a joint hearing of the House Biotechnology Subcommittee and the House Livestock Subcommittee to look at how the current market approval process for agricultural biotechnology products could be made less cumbersome to encourage commercialization. Elsewhere, the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office hosts an event exploring the intersection of copyright law and artificial intelligence, while the Hudson Institute takes a look at studies by the USPTO and the U.S. Copyright Office on state sovereign immunity from IP infringement suits.

This Week in Washington IP: Pride in Patent Ownership Hearing, Library of Congress Modernization Oversight and NASA’s Role in Low-Earth Orbit Space

This week in Washington IP events, the Senate IP Subcommittee convenes a hearing on Tuesday afternoon to debate the Pride in Patent Ownership Act, which would increase requirements on patent owners to disclose changes in patent ownership. NASA’s role in space, including the growing commercial space sector in low-Earth orbit, as well as in developing nuclear propulsion systems for deep space exploration, will be the focus of hearings by other Senate subcommittees. Modernization efforts at the Library of Congress and the U.S. Copyright Office will also be explored by the Senate Rules & Administration Committee. Elsewhere, the House Energy Subcommittee discusses opportunities for growing the domestic offshore wind industry, while ITIF closes the week with a look at President Biden’s executive order on promoting competition as part of the institute’s Dynamic Antitrust Discussion Series.

This Week in Washington IP: Ethics in Artificial Intelligence, Challenges with Carbon Removal and the USPTO Hosts the 2021 Hispanic Innovation and Entrepreneurship Program

This week in Washington IP news, Congress is largely quiet except for a hearing of the House Artificial Intelligence Task Force regarding ethical frameworks for developing artificial intelligence (AI) applications in various industries. Elsewhere in D.C., the Center for Data Innovation explores data driven approaches in addressing e-commerce counterfeits, The Brookings Institution hosts a conversation with Susteon’s Shantanu Agarwal on the challenges of carbon removal tech, and the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office kicks off the 2021 Hispanic Innovation and Entrepreneurship Program with multiple fireside chats and a panel on building networks and resources available to the community of Hispanic innovators.

This Week in Washington IP: Nomination Hearing for Judge Koh, Modernization Efforts at the Library of Congress, and Securing the U.S. Research Enterprise

This week in Washington IP events, in Congress, the House of Representatives holds a joint subcommittee hearing on shoring up cybersecurity in the U.S. research enterprise. Over in the Senate, the Judiciary Committee will consider the nomination of Judge Lucy Koh to sit on the Ninth Circuit, while the Rules Committee will convene for an oversight hearing on the modernization efforts underway at the Library of Congress, including the U.S. Copyright Office. Elsewhere, CSIS opens the week with a conversation with U.S. Trade Representative Katherine Tai, who has played an important role in shaping the United States’ stance on the proposed TRIPS waiver, and ITIF will explore a potential third update to the WTO’s International Trade Agreement to facilitate trade for a large number of new information technologies.

This Week in Washington IP: Name, Image, Likeness Rights for College Athletes; Regulating Cryptocurrencies; and Recapping the U.S.-EU Trade and Technology Council

This week in Washington IP events, the House Consumer Protection Subcommittee within the Energy & Commerce Committee will explore the rapidly expanding landscape for name, image, and likeness (NIL) rights for college athletes, while the Consumer Protection Subcommittee within the House Committee on Financial Services takes a look at technologies that are reshaping the U.S. banking system. The Senate Commerce Committee will also convene a hearing this week looking at consumer data privacy, especially the $1 billion earmarked in the $3.5 trillion House spending plan for the creation of a privacy bureau within the Federal Trade Commission. Elsewhere, The Brookings Institution hosts a discussion on regulating cryptocurrencies, the USPTO gives its second quarterly update on developments in Chinese IP Law, and the Center for Strategic & International Studies closes the week with a recap of developments during the inaugural U.S.-EU Trade and Technology Council scheduled for this week.

This Week in Washington IP: Anticompetitive Acquisitions in Big Data, Copyright Protection in the Digital Age, and Connecting U.S. Innovation with National Security

This week in Washington IP news, various committees at the House of Representatives will meet to discuss the future of NASA’s activities in low-earth orbit, efforts to advance earth system science at NOAA and preserving consumer rights to access personal financial data. Over in the Senate, the Antitrust Subcommittee will follow up on the Federal Trade Commission’s recent activities to rein in anticompetitive behaviors in the high-tech industry. Elsewhere, the Hudson Institute explores what effective copyright protection should look like at this point of the digital age, and the Center for Strategic & International Studies focuses on ways to ensure that U.S. technological competitiveness continues to effectively address national security concerns.

This Week in Washington IP: Protecting State Venue Choices in Big Tech Antitrust Lawsuits, Designing Accessible Digital Public Infrastructure, and Addressing Climate Change and Food Security with Oceanic Tech Developments

This week in Washington IP events, both houses of Congress are mainly quiet this week except for an executive business meeting hosted by the Senate Judiciary Committee to discuss a pair of bills, including one that would protect venue choices by state attorneys general who have brought antitrust actions against Big Tech firms like Google. Elsewhere, New America discusses efforts to build digital public infrastructure to address access concerns raised during the COVID-19 pandemic, and the Atlantic Council explores advances in data collection and technological developments that can help the scientific community gain a better understanding of the world’s oceans to address social problems like climate change.

This Week in Washington IP: PPAC Quarterly Meeting, Pending Nominations Within the DOE’s Science Leadership, and Bills on Composite Technologies and Cybersecurity in U.S. Infrastructure

This week in Washington IP news, the House of Representatives remains quiet as it enters a scheduled district work period. However, several Senate committees will host hearings and business meetings, including the Senate Energy Committee which will discuss pending nominations to important science roles within the U.S. Department of Energy, and the Senate Homeland Security Committee which will explore several bills related to artificial intelligence and cybersecurity matters. Elsewhere, the American Enterprise Institute takes a look at the Federal Reserve’s efforts to establish a digital U.S. dollar, while the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office will hold its most recent quarterly meeting of the Patent Public Advisory Committee this Thursday. 

This Week in Washington IP: Senate Set to Confirm Cunningham; Restoring American Leadership in Patent Law; and Supporting Cybersecurity by Stopping Ransomware

This week in Washington IP news, the U.S. Senate will vote on Tiffany Cunningham’s confirmation to the Federal Circuit, replacing Judge Evan Wallach; and a pair of committees in the House of Representatives, as well as the Senate Energy Committee, explore avenues that federal lawmakers have to stop the scourge of cyberattacks and ransomware impacting our nation’s infrastructure. The House Science Committee will also hold a hearing to discuss wireless spectrum needs for U.S. earth and space science research. Elsewhere, The Heritage Foundation hosts an event on restoring American leadership in patent law with Former USPTO Director Andrei Iancu and Retired Federal Circuit Chief Judge Paul Michel, and The Brookings Institution focuses on possible frameworks to replace the invalidated EU-U.S. Privacy Shield for cross-border data flows.

This Week in Washington IP: SBA Innovation Programs for Creating New Jobs, Law Enforcement’s Use of Facial Recognition Tech, and Punishing Pay-for-Delay Agreements in the Pharmaceutical Sector

This week in Washington IP news, committees in the House of Representatives will host several hearings related to appropriations for various agencies under the jurisdiction of the House Subcommittee on Commerce, Justice, Science, and Related Agencies, as well as the use of facial recognition technologies by federal law enforcement and programs at the U.S. Small Business Administration funding commercialization of emerging new technologies. In the Senate, the Antitrust Subcommittee will host a hearing on Tuesday to explore anticompetitive practices in the pharmaceutical industry, including pay-for-delay agreements that prevent the market entry of generics. Elsewhere, The Brookings Institution looks at recent legislation to support regional tech hubs across America, and the Information Technology & Innovation Foundation discusses a new report on ways the U.S. federal government can support quantum computing research and development.