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Posts Tagged: "wifi"

Cyber Security: How to Protect Your Data Over Wi-Fi

The same technology that makes it easy for you to stay in touch with the office also makes it easy for nefarious individuals to hack your communications and into our devices. Because office computers are generally connected to the same network if a hacker is able to gain access to one machine that shares the network connection they can potentially, and sometimes quite easily, gain access to all of the machines and information on the network. What this means is that computers on the same Wi-Fi network can potentially have access to any unencrypted information that pass through that network.

IEEE policy arbitrarily reduces protection given to Wi-Fi-related patents

The IEEE’s new policy will arbitrarily reduce the level of protection given to Wi-Fi-related patents, impose unconstitutional limits on patent rights, and end the traditional market-based negotiation process for these patents by imposing what amounts to de facto compulsory licensing. Companies that spent many years and billions of dollars in R&D to develop Wi-Fi and other technologies could find themselves unable to recoup their investments.

DOJ should not approve IEEE patent policy weakening WiFi patents

This radical new policy would sharply and artificially reduce the level of protection given to Wi-Fi-related patents. If approved, the change would immediately depress the future development of a technology that is used every day by billions of people worldwide precisely because of the historically competitive, balanced standardization process.

Déjà vu: Targeting Inventors as the New Boogie Man

The attack on individual inventors using names like NPEs and patent trolls is nearly identical to the attacks previously waged by corporate America on personal injury lawyers, using the McDonald’s hot coffee case as an example of lawyer abuse (now it’s the Wi-Fi patent cases). Like the corporate attacks on everything from the private enforcement of securities fraud claims to unfair business practice, civil rights and age discrimination claims, the new target is patent infringement claims brought by “boogie man” entities that don’t manufacture products.

Google Sued for Privacy Violation, Patent App Provides Clues

On May 17, 2010, Google, Inc. was sued in the United States Federal District Court for the District of Oregon by Vicki Van Valin and Neil Mertz; the allegations asserting violation of Oregon, Washington and US privacy statutes (18 USC 2511). The original complaint also seeks to certify a class action against Google, who has already admitted that it engaged in inappropriate collecting of private information from unsuspecting Internet users. Google characterizes the privacy violations as a “mistake,” but a recently published US patent application assigned to Google may suggest that there were those within Google who gave considerable consideration to such an invasion of privacy through the use of sniffer or snooping software.